Will Chest Exercise Increase Post Operative Breast Augmentation Pain?

I'm working out regularly in the gym so my chest muscle are tight although my skin is loose and breast have lost volume and saggy after having baby.

I want to go for Breast Implant with Breast Lift but I heard that tight chest muscle makes the pain worse post op. So, shall I stop chest work out before the surgery?

Thanks for your great responses. This website is so informative.

Doctor Answers (10)

Strong and Toned Muscle an Advantage

+2

I would not ask you to stop working out your pectoral muscles before surgery.

The body is amazing in its ability to accommodate surgical changes. There is no preparation you need do.

Web reference: http://www.drzwiebel.com

Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Working out before breast aug

+2

Hi,

Thank you for your question!

No, you do not necessarily have to stop working out before breast augmentation or lifting surgery. It should not increase post op pain.

I sometimes recommend that patients refrain from working out a week before surgery so you don't injure yourself, but again, you do not have to. You will have to cease strenuous lifting (over 10lbs) for at least 6 weeks after surgery.

Best regards,

Dr. Speron

Chicago Plastic Surgeon

Are Chest Exercises going to make my Breast Augmentation more Painful?

+2

Hi there-

The answer to your question will depend on whether you prefer to have your implants placed over or under your chest muscle... I'm going to assume that you prefer them under the muscle...

In that case, deliberately building up your chest muscle will make the initial placement a bit more uncomfortable for you. That is not to say that you cannot or should not exercise- just that I don't think you should deliberately try to build muscle in your chest area. Focus on a workout that maintains your good health, but not necessarily a strength building one.

I hope that helps you- hope you get the breasts you desire!

Web reference: http://www.DrArmandoSoto.com

Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 82 reviews

Keep exercising after breast augmentation

+2

Exercising has no relationship to pain. Pain is such an individual thing that no one knows why some patients have pain and other have none. I use a long lasting pain medication during surgery so patients have either none or very little for at least 12 hours after surgery. Later on they can take pain medication.

New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Post-op Augmentation Pain

+2

I see no reason for you to discontinue your workouts prior to surgery. I have seen no difference in post-op pain in women with well-developed chest muscles compared to those whose muscles are less well-developed. Obviously you will need to curtail your workouts post-op for a significant period.

Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Tight chest muscles and a breast augmentation

+1

I do not think that the intgretity of the muscle will affect the amount of post-operative pain, but I ask my patients to refrain in definitely from direct chest exercises such as bench presses and dumbell  chest press after surgery as it can casue the implant to move downward and out laterally due to the pressure exerted on the implant by the muscle. 

Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

No need to stop gym chest exercises before a breast augmentation

+1

The post operative pain after breast augmentation is multi-causal; some are surgeon related and some are patient related.

Making the implant pocket sharply and accurately with the electrocautery, minimizing blood loss and contact with the ribs results in significantly less pain after surgery. Women in their late 20's and older and those who had children report much less pain than younger women.

Working your chest muscles will NOT increase the size of the breasts not the amount of pain after breast augmentation. In my opinion, thee is no need to stop your exercises before surgery but you will need to suspend it for a few weeks after your breast augmentation.

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Dr. P. Aldea

Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Pre and post oeprative pectoralis muscle exercise surrounding breast augmentation with implants.

+1

Deliberately working out the pectoralis muscles can result in enhanced vascularity as well as increased muscle bulk. I ask my patients about the reasons for working out the pectoralis muscles. Most say they do this to build up their breasts and in this instance I tell them that the implant will achieve that and we might as well assess the implants sizers without the muscle bulk. There are generally few "fitness" benefits to building the pectoralis muscle and I often advise that they refrain from working the pectoralis for two weeks prior to surgery.

After surgery, I specifically prescribe a course of exercises in the immediated post-operative period to stretch and relax to pectoralis muscles. A video is attached.

Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

Stop pre-breast augmentation chest exercises

+1

Absolutely STOP all pre operative chest wall exercises. But, REALLY, consult your surgeon. They are doing the operation. You need their input not ours. Each of us have slightly differing viewpoints. Regards,

Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Lifestyle and breast augmentation

+1

Since working out is so beneficial on many levels, I wouldn't stop just to reduce pain after an augmentation. Certainly foregoing the exercises for a couple of weeks after the procedure is advisable. I would carefully discuss your alternatives with your surgeon regarding specific technique, size, and post-op pain management as well as long term affects of augmentation.

Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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