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Can I Get Chemical Peels After Electrolysis?

Can I have electrolysis treatments after a series of chemical peels? If I do would it ruin the results of the peels and roughen my skin? And also does it matter if its a mild peel, medium peel, or deep peel? I have'nt done any peels yet just hypotheically speaking.

Doctor Answers (8)

Chemical peels and electrolysis

+1

A series of peels usually refers to light chemical peels.  As long as your skin has healed, you can have electrolysis about 10 days after the peel and wait at least one week before the next light peel.  It will not affect the results of the peel.  With deeper peels, wait at least 10 days after total healing before having electrolysis.


Toronto Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Electrolysis after peels

+1

  I do not think that the electrolysis will have any effect on the chemical peel results, as long as you have healed sufficiently from your peel.

Lawrence Kass, MD
Saint Petersburg Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Electrolysis after a peel, not before.

+1

I agree with Dr. Cohen that if you want to have a peel, make sure it is not irritated and that it is done before the electrolysis.

Daniel I. Wasserman, MD
Naples Dermatologic Surgeon

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Electrolysis after a chemical peel

+1

The best way to answer this is to say that nothing should be done to the skin after a chemical peel until it is completely healed and without complications. Depending on the type of peels this may be anywhere from 1-6 weeks.

Steven Hacker, MD
West Palm Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Yes, but you should wait a few weeks.

+1

There are many different types of chemical peels, and many different concentrations. These can be great treatments for sundamage (pigment and mild wrinkles) as well as acne and melasma. But, we generally make sure that patients don't have irritated skin when these peels are done. It is best to wait a couple of weeks after electrolysis to make sure the skin and follicular structures have recovered. We also often discontinue topical retinoids (like tretinoin/RetinA) a week or so before most peels.

Joel L. Cohen, MD
Denver Dermatologic Surgeon

Depends on peel and skin type

+1

Is you have a fairly light peel(glycolic acid, sal. acid, 15% TCA etc.) it probably doesn't matter. If you have very fair skin, it probably doesn't matter. The main risk of electrolysis after a peel is disturbing what is trying to heal. If you tend to hyperpigment, you might increase this risk. I would ask the doctor doing the peel as they are only ones that know how potent it is and your skin type. Also, wear sunscreen. 

Jo Herzog, MD
Birmingham Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Chemical peels following elctrolysis

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Darker skin types are at more risk of pigment abnormalities following chemical peels.  Glycolic, Mandelic and Salicylic acid peels in strengths lower than 30% can probably be used soon after electroylsis with good post operative sun protection, a shoulder to shoulder hat and a strong UVA/UVB sunblock. TCA peels are more aggressive.  I would not recommend a TCA on the same day as electrolysis.  Seek out an experienced dermatologist or plastic surgeon to evaluate your skin and give you a recommendation.

Mark Taylor, MD
Salt Lake City Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

If you are getting a series of peels, this is not likely to be an issue.

+1

So much depends on the strength of the peel to be performed.  If you are having a series of peels by an aesthetician, these will be so light that electrolysis will have no bearing.  If the peels are being performed by a physician, I would recommend that you seek their advice on this issue.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.