Cheek Implant Repositioning After Fat Transfer?

I had porex malar cheek implants inserted five years ago that will be repositioned (in a lower position). However, they are engraved in fat grafts and some of the fat is hard--a hard lump. Exactly in the area where the hard large lump is the cheek implant will be repositioned: what is likely to happen to the hard fat graft? Will it be pushed upwards, and give me even more (unwanted) projection, or is it likely the hard lump will not survive because of the pocket incision madefa to reposition the cheek implant? Thank you!

Doctor Answers (7)

Consequences of moving Cheek Implants Around

+2

There are several issues here that need to be confronted.

1. You REALLY need to have these questions answered by your surgeon - not by us, If the answers do not make sense - get another opinion.

2. A live / normal fat graft is never a "a hard lump". It sounds like you have dead fat and scar tissue which will remain as a lump regardless of the movement of the underlying implants. You may want to get a MRI to study the relation of the lump to the implant to understand the situation better.

3. POREX implants stick extremely well to the tissues. That makes separating them from the tissues and moving them around surgically challenging. You really need to think twice about it since the result could be worse.

Dr. P. Aldea


Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 59 reviews

Cheek implant repositioning

+2

As most of the expert posters state TRY and leave the porex alone. You will be opening a 'bag of worms' so to speak. Use additional fat transfers to achieve an improved result. Regards.

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Very difficult fat transfer problem.

+2

Hi.

I agree with everything Dr Moelleken told you.  You need a plan to deal with fat transfer lump.  Leave implants alone if at all possible. Get two more opinions.  Unfortunately, you could easily be worse afterwards.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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Fat grafting and cheek implants

+2

This is really an issue that you need to discuss with your surgeon. Moving cheek implants is a tricky operation and, with the added element of overlying fat grafting, it is a complex surgery. Just please make sure that you know what you are getting into before proceeding with surgery. Good luck. With the newer injectables, cheek implants are rarely needed anymore.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Repositioning Porex implants

+2

It is no easy task to reposition Porex implants. They are often adherent to the bone. Repositioning them lower, or even removing them, can endanger the sensory nerves below the eye. If there is a fat injection lump there it should probably be removed. Why would you want a lump in your cheek? With revisional or in your case multiple revisional surgery, you should have a very clear plan on what is to be done. Why is your surgeon not answering these questions for you? It never hurts to have several opinions from top surgeons before proceeding, if only so you know all your possible options.

Brent Moelleken, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 91 reviews

Cheek Implant and fat graft

+2

The cheek implant rests on the bone whereas the fat in in the subcutaneous tissues. The hard lump from the fat grafting will not change position but it may become more visible and you could develop a double bubble type appearance.

Obviously, this is only an educated guess and your best option is to ask the surgeon performing the procedure.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Porex Cheek Implants and Fat Grafting

+1

As Dr Moelleken stated it can be difficult to reposition Porex implants. If the lump is fat, it should be removed. Remaining cheek contour problems could be addressed with more fat injections.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.