Will a TT Redo Fix This TT Scar and This BB Issue? (photo)

I was never happy with the positioning of this scar. It's much too high and its sticks out of every pair of underwear & bikini bottom that I have and even a pair of low rise jeans. Will a TT redo fix this scar position? Also I was told that my BB was floating already when he opened me up. Post Surgery my BB looks closed and very unnatural. Considering he said it was already floating..once you have a floating BB can it ever look nice and natural again? How?Can these 2 things be fixed? If so how?

Doctor Answers (8)

Tummy Tuck Revision - Lowering Scars and Floating Belly Button Correction

+1

Yes your scar can be lowered so it is hidden beneath your panty- line and also at the junction of your pubic hair bearing area. At the same time the belly button stalk can be reattached to the underlying muscles fixing its position so it will not be pulled down too much.

Regarding the potential for a red raised scar please note the following advice that I recommend to my patient in these circumstances:

Best Scar Management is important to minimize or completely hide from view, the tell tale signs of surgery – namely, scars. Both you and your surgeon want you to have the most minimal scarring possible from your surgery.  Patients with scars that are enlarged or not healing well after surgery can be from many causes. Unsightly scars are most commonly due to genetics, underlying medical conditions or improper scar/wound care. The last part is very important and patients can make a noticeable difference in their scars’ appearance by following best scar management practices. Here are some simple tips.
Scar Management tips:
1- Minimize tension on the scar – Steri Strips and/or surgical tape are often placed in non-hair bearing areas to minimize tension and keep pressure over the scar.  This minimizes the  stress that  can pull the scar apart (dehiscence) creating a wound and  delaying healing time, and can make the scar wider, or more “ropy”.
2– Keep your incision site/scar clean to prevent infection. Follow your surgeon’s wound care instructions to the letter with out modification. NEVER apply different products then recommended without first discussing them with your surgeon. This is especially important during the first few weeks. If there are any signs of infection contact your surgeon’s office immediately and/or see your doctor or his nurse immediately. Typical signs of infection may include redness outside the immediate incision site, asymmetric swelling, and drainage, of pus, fever, chills, and “feeling sick”.
3. –Protect your scars from the sun - staying out of the sun is the best advice. Minimal exposure to sunlight is prevents hyperpigmentation (permanently turning brown) and other problems that can make the scar more noticeable. Sunscreen, at least 30 SPF and an overlying make camouflage make up additionally protects the scar from the suns harmful rays. This advice is especially important the first year following your surgery.  .
4. – Use specific scar maturation products recommended by your surgeon. Patients seem to have their own opinions on this touting everything from Pure Vit E, Coco butter, to Aloe Vera, etc but most have minimal benefit other than keeping the scar hydrated. Although hydration is important there are better, scientifically studied products with greater efficacy. Most of the scientific articles written about this subject indicate that topical silicone gel or silicone sheets work the best.  There are a lot of products to choose from, but silicone should be one of the key ingredients. Although Mederma, an onion extract derivative active ingredient rather than mainly silicone based may help, primarily silicone based products are better and many also contain other ingredients that may be synergistic (hydrocortisone or other steroid, Vitamin E, Sunscreen,etc). At the present time I prefer BioCorneum  or Kelo-Cote products and if the reader has problems obtaining these they can call my office. Patient compliance is also critical – use often and according to directions or it will not work optimally. NEVER apply products without first discussing them with your surgeon.
5. – Monitor to make sure your scar is progressing optimally. Keep your scheduled follow-up appointments with your surgeon to verify that your scars are maturing as expected.  Occasionally if indicated you may need a topical steroid preparation or even a series of  injections (5-FU and/or Steroids) or laser treatments  to treat or  prevent scar hypertrophy or keloid formation (red raised scars), or other topical medicines to treat post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (brown scars) with prescription creams and possible laser treatments.

Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars after Facelift
Best Scar Management Practice – Advice from Dr. Larry Nichter:
In your particular case it sounds like you have a hypertrophic scar rather than a keloid. Either way my advice is similar. At this late point you may well need a scar revision, a minor office procedure to remove your scar and replace it with a new one. Below are what I feel is important to prevent a future bad scar:
Best Scar Management is important to minimize or completely hide from view, the tell tale signs of surgery – namely, scars. Both you and your surgeon want you to have the most minimal scarring possible from your surgery.  Patients with scars that are enlarged or not healing well after surgery can be from many causes. Unsightly scars are most commonly due to genetics, underlying medical conditions or improper scar/wound care. The last part is very important and patients can make a noticeable difference in their scars’ appearance by following best scar management practices. Here are some simple tips.
Scar Management tips:
1- Minimize tension on the scar – Steri Strips and/or surgical tape are often placed in non-hair bearing areas to minimize tension and keep pressure over the scar.  This minimizes the stress that can pull the scar apart (dehiscence) creating a wound and  delaying healing time, and can make the scar wider, or more “ropy”.
2– Keep your incision site/scar clean to prevent infection. Follow your surgeon’s wound care instructions to the letter with out modification. NEVER apply different products then recommended without first discussing them with your surgeon. This is especially important during the first few weeks. If there are any signs of infection contact your surgeon’s office immediately and/or see your doctor or his nurse immediately. Typical signs of infection may include redness outside the immediate incision site, asymmetric swelling, and drainage, of pus, fever, chills, and “feeling sick”.
3. –Protect your scars from the sun - staying out of the sun is the best advice. Minimal exposure to sunlight is prevents hyperpigmentation (permanently turning brown) and other problems that can make the scar more noticeable. Sunscreen, at least 30 SPF and an overlying make camouflage make up additionally protects the scar from the suns harmful rays. This advice is especially important the first year following your surgery.  .
4. – Use specific scar maturation products recommended by your surgeon. Patients seem to have their own opinions on this touting everything from Pure Vit E, Coco butter, to Aloe Vera, etc but most have minimal benefit other than keeping the scar hydrated. Although hydration is important there are better, scientifically studied products with greater efficacy. Most of the scientific articles written about this subject indicate that topical silicone gel or silicone sheets work the best.  There are a lot of products to choose from, but silicone should be one of the key ingredients. Although Mederma, an onion extract derivative active ingredient rather than mainly silicone based may help, primarily silicone based products are better and many also contain other ingredients that may be synergistic (hydrocortisone or other steroid, Vitamin E, Sunscreen,etc). At the present time I prefer BioCorneum  or Kelo-Cote products and if the reader has problems obtaining these they can call my office. Patient compliance is also critical – use often and according to directions or it will not work optimally. NEVER apply products without first discussing them with your surgeon.
5. – Monitor to make sure your scar is progressing optimally. Keep your scheduled follow-up appointments with your surgeon to verify that your scars are maturing as expected.  Occasionally if indicated you may need a topical or injection of a steroid preparation or even a series of  injections (5-FU and/or Steroids) or laser treatments  to treat or  prevent scar hypertrophy or keloid formation (red raised scars), or other topical medicines to treat post inflammatory hyperpigmentation (brown scars) with prescription creams and possible laser treatments.
 


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

Revision CAN LOWER The SCAR

+1

#next_pages_container { width: 5px; hight: 5px; position: absolute; top: -100px; left: -100px; z-index: 2147483647 !important; } I believe that many surgeons would do a lazy W scar just above the pubic hairline and while you are open the belly button could be attached to the umbilical cord once again.  These two changes would improve the overall outcome greatly.  I wish you the best in dealing with this.

It would be best for you to talk to another surgeon or two.

 

Robert B. Winslow, MD (in memoriam)
Folsom Plastic Surgeon
1.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Can tummy tuck revision fix this? (photos)

+1

YES, revision can improve your situation, but must be skillfully planned and executed.  Seek the best expertise available in your area.  This is a procedure done under general anesthesia in my hands, and expectations clearly established beforehand.  Not sure what your surgeon meant by indicating your belly button was already "floating".  This would be highly unusual...

Steve Laverson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

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Some options, some difficult choices

+1

Hello,

Thank you for the photos.  I am assuming that you would like to lower and improve the quality of the horizontal incision and try to attain a more natural looking belly button.  To lower your incision the full tummy tuck will have to be redone.  How much it can be lowered will depend on how much laxity is still present.  For your belly button, recruiting skin from the periphery and having the belly button sit deeper but with a more natural opening would be the goal.  Your current belly button position will have to be close in a vertical incision, about 1 inch long, that would be somewhere between its current location and the low horizontal incision.  A link to one of my patients before and after photos is listed below.

All the best,

Dr Remus Repta

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 95 reviews

Revision after tummy tuck, floating belly button

+1

Lowering a tummy tuck scar can be a challenge, especially if the remaining skin laxity is not able to allow it. Of course, it is best to keep the incision low from the start. If your belly button is not attached to the muscle below, and yours does look low, then this too is a challenge to repair. An opinion from a board certified plastic surgeon is the way to go.

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

Your incision can be lowered

+1

I would say that you have good result from your surgery when compare before and after. The issue of the belly button and scar position can be corrected. You had umbilical hernia before surgery and it is much improved. Your after surgery shows muscle lines that you could not see before. Your have hypertrophic scar and high scar that can be revised.

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Yes i can be lowered and BB improved/ si es posible bajar mas la cicatriz y mejorar los gluteso

+1

before answering your questions  i would like  very much with which kind of surgeon did you go to realize this kind of aesthetic surgery we dont need the name only please   specify the cathegory, cosmetic surgeon? general surgeon? maxilofacial surgeon? dentistry surgeon? dermathological surgeon? G.O. Surgeon? or a registrated aesthetic plastic surgeon ASAPS member? board certified?

antes de responder sus preguntas si nos interesaria mucho saber con quien acudio ud. a la cirugia abdominal previa por favor  responda:fue con el cirujano geneeral? cirujano cosmetico?con el cirujano maxilofacial? con el cirujano dental? con el cirujano dermatologo? con el cirujano ginecobtetra?  o bien acudio a un cirujano plastico estetico certificado por la  ASAPS?

Ramon Navarro, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon

ReDo Tummy Tuck

+1

Without more information about the actual surgery or examining you in person, it is difficult to give you more specific advice.  If there is enough lax skin to excise all the skin between your belly button and your pubis, then you may be able to have a significant improvement.  However, if your belly button is truly "floating," meaning that that is not connected to its natural blood supply from below, then it will be very difficult to improve the look of your belly button.  Based on your pre-op pictures, I cannot understand how you ended up with the result that you did.  

 

Good Luck.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.