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Charging for Botox or Restylane by the Syringe. Is That Norman Pratice?

Is it normal practice to charge for Botox and restylane by te syringe. What is it does not take a full syringe?

Doctor Answers (19)

Charging for Botox or filler by the syringe

+2

One big misconception is that you are paying for a "syringe" of Botox or Dysport- if someone sell it to you as such, run. Both are dosed as "unit" based injections. Since a syringe may contain no active product or a full bottle of active product , buying a syringe (typically sold by low end injectors) is a bad way to do it.

Instead, ask how many units you are purchasing.

Fillers, in contrast, are sold in pre-filled syringes but there are different size syringes and some places offer discounted pricing but use syringes that are 1/2 the normal volume to get you in the door. So, as with everything, you are best served by doing some homework and sticking with someone that is reputable. Dont shop for a discount when you are getting medical care or cosmetic surgery.

Since the doctor's cost is related to what he or she injects, it is perfectly reasonable to discuss the amount of units of Botox or Dysport or quantity of filler that is being used


Palm Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Fees For Restylane and Botox

+2

The most common way of charging for Botox is by units injected.  This is the fairest way to the patient since the Botox can be diluted differently by different physicians.  Restylane, on the other hand, is charged by the syringe since the syringes cannot be shared among patients.

John Whitt, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Charge for botox and filler

+1

It is normal to charge for a syringe of filler, or vial of Sculpta. Left over product is not recommended to be saved by the manufacturer.  Botox is usually charged by the unit or the cosmetic area but if a physician typically uses the same amount of units per cosmetic area and they prefill a syirnge of botox, then maybe they're charging per area and not syringe.  Syringes of fillers are prepared in advance by the manufacturer but the physician draws up exactly what they wish in the numbers of units of Botox into each syringe.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

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Restylane, Botox - Charging for Botox or Restylane by the Syringe. Is That Normal Practice?

+1

Policies vary widely on this issue but here are some guidelines:

1)  Botox and Dysport typically come in vials that have enough for 1, 2 or 3 patients, depending on how much each patient requires.  If your physician does this procedure often enough so that there is always a relatively fresh vial of the material available, then it is typical to charge either by unit of Botox/Dysport (it takes about 2-2.5 units of Dysport to equal the effect of 1 unit of Botox) or areas being treated.

2)  However, some would argue that, over time, the material loses its effectiveness and, to that extent, one might benefit from knowing that the Botox is being prepared (both come as freeze-dried precipitates that are mixed into solution by adding some saline) is new and was made up for the individual patient.  In that case, it is relevant that Botox comes in vials of 50 or 100 units, and so some physicians only treat patients once they know that they have that amount accounted for.  That may require bunching patients together, or all on the same day, etc.  If you walk in and get get only a few units of Botox, you have to reasonably ask how the physician was able to have that available.

3)  Fillers, by contrast, come in pre-filled syringes, and the norm is to charge by syringe.  Some people can get the effect they want with one syringe, others require more.  The most commonly used fillers include Restylane, Perlane, Juvederm, Radiesse, Sculptra and Autologous Fat Injections.  You should talk to your physician about what you'd like to accomplish and exactly how much filler will be required.  That is no time to be surprised!

I hope that this helps, and good luck,

Dr. E

Alan M. Engler, MD, FACS
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 148 reviews

Common Pricing Practices for Botox and Restylane

+1

Greetings~

Most offices in our area charge by the unit for Botox...so you are only charged for what is drawn up from the bottle and used on you in that visit. One bottle of Botox can be divided among multiple patients because a specific amount can be drawn up without risking contamination. Restylane, on the other hand is sold only by the syringe.  One syringe is only used for one person, they may not be shared.  If you don't use all of the Restylane in the area you ideally want treated, your injector can advise you on where else it may look best.

Good luck~

Dr. Grant Stevens    

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

It is common practice to charge for Restylane by the syringe

+1

It is common practice to charge for Restylane by the syringe.  BOTOX is charged by the unit since it doesn’t come in syringes.  Most of these treatments are based on the amount of product used.  Some doctors do charge differently depending on the area injected.

Joseph A. Eviatar, MD, FACS
New York Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Charges for Restylane and Botox

+1

There is no standard as to how offices charge for these products.  Restylane comes by the syringe and is charged as such since it cannot be used on anyone else.  If you do not need the full syringe, it is discarded.  Botox can be charged by area or by units.  It is important to ask the concentration and units per injection and how many injections will be performed.  That is because it can be diluted a number of different ways.

Albert Dabbah, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon

Restylane

+1

Restylane is typically charged by the syringe or by cc as the syringes come in different sizes. I use the entire syringe for the same patient, so it is not shared.  Botox is charged by either the number of units or by area.  

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Did I really get all the Botox I paid for?

+1

Would you take your car to a garage and have the attendant put gas into your tank and then pay him a certain amount of money with out actually knowing  (or seeing) the exact amount of gas you received? What if he charged you for more than he actually gave you?  Same thing for Botox. You should know how many 'units' of Botox you received. Being charged for areas injected/treated leaves you open to dishonest charges although I'd hope/expect those charging by the area actually charge fairly. However you could actually be paying more per unit than necessary because your injector hides his per unit charges by area charging.

Harlow Hollis, MD
Victoria Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Charging for Botox and Restylane by the syringe

+1

 I have used Botox and fillers for over 20 years and in our office, we charge for Botox by the treated area (Glabella, Crow's feet, Forehead etc) which is based on using so many units of Botox

 Fillers come in sterile syringes and yes, it's standard to charge for the full syringe regardless of you using all or part of that syringe.  It is a vilolation, IMHO, of numerous regulatory policies to save unused portions of syringes of patients for future use.  There's no way to predict or control contaimination of the used syringe and materials nor a way to be certain you get your own syringe back.  Some MD's bow to pressure from patients to engage in this practice but it is ill advised and is not safe, IMO.  It's far better to wait until you require enough correction to use the entire syringe.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.