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No Cesarean Complications, Expect Same with Tummy Tuck?

I am very nervous about being put under as this is my first major surgery besides my cesarean. I am in good health with no concerns except for mitral valve prolapse or a slight heart murmur. I had no complications with my cesarean, so can I expect the same with my tummy tuck?

Doctor Answers (9)

Concerns before anesthesia.

+1

Have you disclosed your mitral valve prolapse with your surgeon's office?  If you are clear for surgery, then you should relax as your concerns are normal.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Risks for a tummy tuck versus a Caesarean section

+1

Having done well following your Caesarean section surgery is great but not necessarily a predictor of your outcome from a tummy tuck surgery. Given what appears to be excellent health, and if you are a non-smoker, not overweight or significantly so, and avoid blood thinners such as aspirin and ibuprofen 2 weeks prior to surgery, your risks should be fairly low. Obviously, you would want to have this performed by a board certified plastic surgeon and have a board certified anesthesiologist with experience in plastic surgery performing your anesthesia.

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

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Tummy tuck and c-sections

+1

I have been told by my patients that the recovery from a c-section is usually worse than a tummy tuck.  Good luck.

Steven Wallach, MD
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Tummy Tuck Complication

+1

Every procedure carries potential risks and complication.  However, as long as you are in good health and non-smoker, you will do well.  Tummy tuck is an elective surgery which normally last 2-4 hours.  Surgical and anesthesia risks for tummy tuck is very low; however, you should review them with your plastic surgeon prior to your surgery.

Sugene Kim, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
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Tummy tuck is less invasive than a ceserean

+1

It is a good sign that you did well after your C-section. With a tummy tuck, there is no opening into the body as there is with a C-section so the recovery may be easier and the surgery itself safer. If you are going to a surgeon certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery who uses an accredited surgical facility, you should know that appropriate safety precautions are being used.

Richard Baxter, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
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Tummy Tuck Complications

+1

The fact that you had no complications with your C-section does not in any way assure that you will not have complications following a tummy tuck.  Every operation carries some risk and the patient must always weigh the benefits against the potential risks.

John Whitt, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
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Risks of Tummy Tuck in a Healthy Young Woman

+1

Surgery and anesthesia have come a long way. The odds of your having complications with a tummy tuck, if you are young, not obese, no medical conditions, do not smoke and do not have a family history of sudden death or blood clots, is extremely low. While it is never zero they are quite uncommon.

Discuss your fears with your surgeon and he will tell you the same.

Good Luck.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

All surgery has some risk, but tummy tuck is a safe operation.

+1
Any surgery has risks. Tummy tuck has risks also. In general, if you are healthy the chance of anything serious going wrong is very low. If this were not the case we would not be able to do elective surgeries like this. Make sure you eat well and rest both before and after the surgery. Also make sure your surgeon is certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery and that the operating room in which you are having surgery is fully accredited.

Elizabeth Slass Lee, MD
Bay Area Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.