Could I Have CC? or is There Something else Possibly?

i was 4 weeks post op when i thought i had CC in my right boob, the bottom right corner got harder in what seemed like over night, now i massage and take ibuprofen and it softened up, but when i massage it gets hard again. maybe it's not CC. what else could be wrong. my P.S. is a jerk :(( and i am actually in the process of finding a new one. can you please help me with any ideas and what i can do. also how long should i take ibuprofen and put a warm rag. thank you sooo much.also looking for PS

Doctor Answers (8)

Capsular Contracture and Hardness at 4 Weeks

+1

    Capsular contracture is progressive and if you are going to develop it give it some more time.  4 weeks is early to make that diagnosis.  This could be scar tissue.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Hughesplasticsurgery Los Angeles, CA


Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

Early hardness after augmentation

+1

If your hardening area is limited to one spot, it may just be scar tissues. It's generally too early to see capsular contracture at 4 weeks postop. At this point it's probably best to continue massaging and keep regular follow up visits with your plastic surgeon. If you want to be certain then consider getting a second opinion.

Best Wishes,

Stewart Wang, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

It Does does Not Sound Like a Capsular Contracture

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Your description does not sound like a capsular contracture, and it would be very unusual to have a capsular contracture show up so early after surgery. 

There are a variety of possibilities for the cause, but it is impossible to narrow them down without an exam. 

I would recommend either a repeat evaluation with your surgeon or a second opinion.

David P. Stapenhorst, MD
Sugar Land Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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Firmness in breast

+1

It is unlikely that you have developed a capsular contracture so soon after surgery.  Without an exam it is hard to say, I suggest that if you are unhappy with your surgeon seek another opinion in person with someone else.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Several Options Possible

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It is unlikely that this is early capsular contracture but more commonly asymmetric swelling or some fluid within the pocket of the right breast.  It can also be the implant that you are feeling.  Using warm compresses, anti-inflammatories and gentle massages may have a soothing temporary effect but if this doesn't improve soon further investigation is necessary.  A thorough physical exam combined with a sonogram to determine if there is a fluid collection can help to explain the situation.  Good luck...  

Eric Sadeh, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

CAPSULE CONTRACTURE

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IT IS NOT EASY TO DIAGNOSE A CC BY DESCRIPTION ONLY.  SEEMS TO ME TOO SOON (4 WEEKS) FOR A HARD CAPSULE ??REMOTE CAUSE: seroma, hematoma . Came to my attention that you mention an area only, a hard capsule should be the entire area. You need to be evaluated by a p.s. //   Best ...  Dr. Vega -Tijuana 

 

 

Ricardo Vega, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Capsular contrcture

+1

This does not sound like a contracture, but it is impossible to tell by description only. If you do not want to go back to your PS, then find another one for evaluation. Can't recommend treatment unless we no the cause.

Gregory Sexton, MD
Columbia Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Could I Have CC?

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With a capsular contracture, the entire implant would feel firm, not just one area. Without the benefit of an examination, I don't feel capable of guessing what this may be or how to treat it. If you don't want to be evaluated by your own surgeon, RealSelf has geographic listings  of plastic surgeons. Best wishes.

Jourdan Gottlieb, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.