What Causes Implants to Change Shape and Get Bulges 2 Years Post-Op? (photo)

i had my implant surgery 1yr9mos ago,i went from A to a D, the implants are Mentor smooth moderate profile saline and are over the muscle(even though i wanted them under)I absolutely loved them. i may not have had much but definitely had some of my own breast tissue,but now feels like nothing is between the implant and skin, assymetry is getting worse, my left breast is significantly firmer than the other and has a visible "ridge" down the top then goes flat then big bulge

Doctor Answers (6)

What Causes Implants to Change Shape and Get Bulges 2 Years Post-Op? (photo)

+1

Based only upon the posted photos you appear as a capsular fibrosis and ripple effect. Seek in person evaluations. 


Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Breast Implants Changing Shape

+1

You may have very thin breast tissue so the implants are more noticeable. You may also be developing a capsular contracture.

Karol A. Gutowski, MD, FACS
Ohio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Implants and ridging

+1

Being that they are under the gland, there is noticeable rippling.  The tissues look a bit thin and you  may benefit from having the under the muscle.  You may also have a capsular contracture on the tight side.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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You have minimal breast tissue to cover the implants

+1

You main issue is the lack of soft tissue to cover the implants. The placement of the saline implants above the muscle and mild capsular contracture has made the situation worse. Your options are to replace implants with silicone gel implants, add fat to increase soft tissue and place the implants under the muscle.  

Kamran Khoobehi, MD
New Orleans Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Capsular contracture

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As Dr. Pousti indicates, you are likely developing capsular contracture or hardening. As the capsule thickens and shrinks in this process the breast feels harder and the ripples become more evident. In addition to the treatments Dr. Pousti mentions, one other option to consider is fat grafting over the implant. This can be effective if the capsular contracture is still relatively mild and effectively will thicken the tissues over the implants and help conceal the rippling. Even if not successful, having thicker tissues will be of benefit should you require more extensive surgery to change implants, remove the scar tissue etc.

Finally complete replacement of the implants with fat grafting is also possible, but will require multiple stages. Unfortunately even if you do change the implants to under the muscle etc, you are still at a higher risk of recurrence of capsular contracture.

Jeffrey Hartog, MD
Orlando Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Changes of Breasts after Breast Augmentation?

+1

Thank you for the question and pictures.

I'm sorry to hear about your dissatisfaction after breast augmentation surgery.

Although difficult to make a diagnosis based on history and pictures alone,  I think you may be dealing with encapsulation (capsular contracture)  of the left breast implant. this process may explain the firmness of this breast  as well as the worsening asymmetry. Both implants appear to have significant rippling present.

You will benefit from in person consultation with a board-certified plastic surgeon well-versed with revisionary breast surgery. Revisionary surgery may involve options such as capsulectomy,  exchange of saline to silicone breast implants,  change of breast implant pockets to submuscular position and/or mastopexy surgery ( if necessary).

 I hope this helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.