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Cause and Treatment for Flushing Nose

The bridge of my nose turns very red whenever my temperature rises. What could this be? Coworkers of mine mentioned I should see a doctor because it could cause problems. Do I need nose surgery to fix this? It turns red almost every time my heart rate gets faster.

Doctor Answers (2)

Probably rosacea

+2

The cause of your intermittent flushing is likely to be rosacea. This is a chronic condition which is cahacterized by periodic flare ups after exposure to heat, cold, spicy foods, red wine etc. Patients with this can find out their "triggers" and learn to avoid them. Also, IPL lasers can minimize the flushing by shrinking the blood vessels that dilate and cause the redness.


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

Facial and Nasal Skin Flushing and Laser

+1

Most commonly, facial and nasal skin flushing is related to adult onset Acne Rosacea. Rosacea has 4 possible forms including red bumps (papules), white juicy bums (pustules), tiny blood vessels (capillaries) and a thickening of the skin related to a build up of the oil glands (rhinophyma). Most people don't have all four components, and women very rarely have the rhinophyma. Many people only have the red capillaries which dilate, flush, engorge, etc. as the blood flow increases, temperature rises, stress is experienced, coming out of hot shower, exercise, spicy food, etc. If you have the capillary form of Rosacea then V-beam laser, IPL and other lasers can minimize the vessels. There is no cure for rosacea, but maintenance treatment is usually successful. There can be other causes though for your red nose and you should see a dermatologist to determine the most likely diagnosis. If it were a systemic hormonal situation, your cheeks and chin could flush too so if it is limited to your nose, a localized vascular condition should be ruled out.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.