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Can Cartilage Be Shaped/operated on During a Rhinoplasty or Only the Bone/bridge Area?

My nose has quite a large hook and sticks out pretty far from my face. I'm worried that if I get rhinoplasty and the hump removed that my nose will be long and pointy. Could the cartilage be cut/operated on so that the tip of my nose won't end up sticking out compared to the rest of my nose once the hump has been removed? Thanks!

Doctor Answers (6)

Reshaping the cartilage of the tip of the nose

+1

It certainly can be reshaped.  Avoiding a "pointy" nose after reducing the hump is one of the primary goals of rhinoplasty surgeons, and often requires modifying the tip to help maintain harmony between the new nose and the rest of the face.  This must be individualized for every patient and may require bringing the nasal tip closer to the face (deprojecting it), or raising the tip (rotating it) by carefully removing certain portions of the cartilage, reshaping the existing cartilage, or adding cartilage.  Hope that helps!  -Hove Center for Facial Plastic Surgery

Paoli Facial Plastic Surgeon

Balanced nose rhinoplasty

+1

 The important concepts  when performing rhinoplasty  is to make sure all the components of the nose balance with each other, and your facial features. What this means is the nasal bones, the upper lateral cartilages, the lower lateral cartilages and the dorsal septum almost the  harmoniously changed to give the new appearance to the nose that looks natural. please see  our  rhinoplasty photo gallery below  for examples.

Web reference: http://www.seattlefacial.com/progallery/dorsalhumpy_photos24.html

Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 52 reviews

Rhinoplasty and proportion

+1

Hi Belle,

A rhinoplasty is all about proportion and in most cases if there is a change in one part of the nose then there needs to be a change in the other parts of the nose to maintain balence. The key then is to alter what need to be altered, bone and cartilage , to create the result that is in proportion with your face.

Most rhinoplasties will need alteration to bone and cartilage to achieve the best result, and this is how to avoid your concern of a hump reduction leaving a tip that is too pointy.

I hope that is of some help

Jeremy Hunt 

 

Web reference: http://www.drjeremyhunt.com.au

Sydney Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Can Cartilage Be Shaped/operated on During a Rhinoplasty or Only the Bone/bridge Area?

+1

Absolutely. The entire nasal anatomy can be modified during rhinoplasty, as needed, to achieve the goals that you and your plastic surgeon create for the result. This can involve changing the shape of the nose, projection of the tip or the amount of upturn in the nasal tip. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS

Web reference: http://weberfacialplasticsurgery.com/rhinoplasty/

Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Basic rhinoplasty questions

+1

Hi Belle,

When you have a rhinoplasty, all the bone and cartilage elements which require alteration can be altered.  The idea is to end up with a harmonious result, where all the elements of the nose fit in with each other to create a beautiful nose.

During the consultations you might have with the surgeon you choose, all aspects of the rhinoplasty can be planned so that you're part of the planning process.

All the best.

Melbourne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Rhinoplasty addresses all parts of the nose that require modification.

+1

You are completely right that if only part of your nose is addressed, it will likely end up looking funny. During rhinoplasty, plastic surgeons modify nasal bones, but also correspondingly alter the nasal cartilages that help determine the nasal shape. These maneuvers are executed carefully and expertly to make sure your nose looks natural and is well-proportioned.

Baltimore Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.