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If I am a candidate for either the lollipop or the anchor technique how do I decide? (photo)

In which way would each affect the final look of the breasts other than the obvious difference in scar patterns? I am trying to figure out which one to go with. I am a D/DD cup and want to go down to a large B very small C. My natural breast are rather wide at the bottom and I get rashes were the skin of the breast touches my ribcage so I want that lifted up but I don't want to have them project outward much.

Doctor Answers (11)

Anchor Type Lift or Lollipop

+3
Your question is a very common one and central to a good conversation between a plastic surgeon and a patient. Both styles provide good results in the right setting.  Most of my colleagues seem to favor the vertical or lollipop reduction in younger women as it resets the shape of the breast tissue rather than relying on the skin to act like a tight brassiere in keeping the breast shape. As we age, that skin stretches and the anchor type can have issues in time.  My personal opinion is that the shape and appearance of a lift using a vertical technique is better both in the short and long term. I included a link to a patient to show the dramatic shape changes that can be made with just the lollipop incision. Of course, nothing replaces the value of a good exam and an open, honest discussion with your plastic surgeon.
Best,
Dr. Pyle


Raleigh-Durham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Anchor or lollipop

+2
Dear Sherbike,

It really depends on your priorities.  If you want less scar then the lollipop technique will be better.  If you a flatter, smaller breast the anchor technique will do a better job.  The results with either are quite good and most patients are very happy.  I would make an appointment to see and experience plastic surgeon.  They will be able to go over all of the pros and cons of each technique.

Richard A. Bartlett, MD
Brookline Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

What type of breast reduction incision?

+2
You would be a candidate for either the lollipop or anchor technique, and have a great result with both.  The horizontal scar along your underside of your breast in the anchor technique typically heals very well.  I would recommend that you consult with a board certified plastic surgeon to help you make this decision.  The decision regarding the technique should be made between you and your plastic surgeon. The technique that he or she feels most comfortable will give you the best result is the one you should go with.

James C. Grotting, MD, FACS
Birmingham Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Breast reduction techniques

+2
I think that an exam in person is essential. You can have either technique most likely. I will say that probably more tissue can be removed using a "T" or anchor if you want to be on the small side.  It is extremely unlikely that you could get down to the picture from 28 yrs ago and still have a nice shape.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

If I am a candidate for either the lollipop or the anchor technique how do I decide?

+1
A circumvertical breast lift or an anchor lift would be reasonable options to help your situation.

For the lift, I typically start with the smallest incision and custom tailor each breast lift to the shortest scar possible.

Find a board certified plastic surgeon who performs hundreds of breast lifts each year. Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 193 reviews

If I am a candidate for either the lollipop or the anchor technique how do I decide?

+1
Both techniques can give you the results you want. It is important to decide what scar you would prefer.
Once you have done that, you need to pick a Surgeon who you think will give you the results. The scars will fade and will be less of an issue in 12 months.

Naveen Somia, MBBS, PhD, FRACS
Sydney Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Anchor or Lollipop

+1
The key to providing an optimal result is to have a frank discussion with your Board Certified Plastic Surgeon.  Each surgeon has techniques that they are much more proficient in and more comfortable with.  There are numerous surgeons that would say anchor pattern for you and numerous surgeons that would say lollipop pattern.  I personally have had excellent results from both techniques.  I choose based on patient acceptance of scars, skin tissue quality, and the size of reduction that will be performed.  Sometimes I use a combination of the two incision patterns.  Your surgeon will be able to help you decide.  

Good Luck, 

Gaurav Bharti

Gaurav Bharti, MD
Johnson City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

Anchor or lollipop technique

+1
based on your photos, I would recommend the anchor technique to give the best shape. I do not feel that the scar under the breast if properly closed should give a reasonable scar.

Rick Rosen, MD
Norwalk Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Surgeon preference

+1

I prefer the anchor incision with breast reductions -- which will work well for you. I make the under breast scars short -- but they help round out the breasts and they look great right after surgery.

William B. Rosenblatt, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Breast lift or breast reduction?

+1
Hi,
Many thanks for a wonderful in fact an intellectual question.I see that your younger picture (28 yrs ag )is not more than full A cup or at the most a small B cup.I am sure this is not what you desire now.If you do than I agree that you do need a breast reduction.However if a Full C cup is your desire than a lollypop lift can do it for you with some modifications that I use in my practice in Dubai.
I wish you good luck

Ashok Govila, FRCS, MCh, MS
Dubai Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 43 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.