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Can a Nurse Do my Botox Cosmetic Injection?

How do you know if a nurse is a safe Botox injector, or legal in your state?

Doctor Answers (12)

Check your nurse's credentials, licensure, and physician supervision

+3
  • Since there are different levels of nursing degrees, you may ask your physician or nurse if they are a registered nurse, certified nurse, or licensed nurse practitioner.
  • You can also check their license through the state board, as well as any complaints.
  • Even if nurse injectors are legal in your state, your physician is legally responsible for supervision and that appropriate safety measures exist for the injection performed by a nurse.


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Can a Nurse Do my Botox Cosmetic Injection?

+1

A nurse can inject your Botox but I highly recommend that you have a board certified Plastic Surgeon or Dermatologist inject your wrinkles as they are ultimately responsible for the result.  As for legality you would have to check with your state medical board for an answer.

Thomas Guillot, MD
Baton Rouge Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

You get what you pay for

+1

The most important consideration for any Botox treatment is not the cost but the expertise of the doctor doing the injection.

Please Google safeandethicaldoctors for additional information.

Charles Crutchfield, MD
Minneapolis Dermatologic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

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Nurses can inject Botox depending on your state's medical board

+1

First you should check your state's medical board and nursing board to see if a licensed nurse (there are different levels of nursing degrees) can inject Botox in your state and you can check their license for any complaints.

Even if nurse injectors can legally inject in your state the physician they practice under are legally responsible for their supervision, education, and safety of the patient.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Who injects your BOTOX

+1

I strongly believe that your dermatologist or plastic surgeon should personally inject your BOTOX or fillers. Although there are nurses and other types of physicians injecting BOTOX, it really is a matter of what is best as far as safety and results. Its like when you need a real estate lawyer -- although a divorce lawyer might know a few things about real estate, the real estate lawyer knows his area of law in incredible detail such that you get the best outcome with no regrets. Specialist doctors or lawyers interestingly are often no more expensive either!

Benjamin Barankin, MD
Toronto Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Nurses and Botox

+1

The question of whether or not it is legal for a nurse to inject Botox is addressed by each state's medical and nursing boards. So you should be able to find out from these state boards if it is legal in your state.

Regarding safety and for that matter skill, it is very common for nurses (only Registered Nurses, not LVNs or other types of nurses) in California to inject Botox and there are many excellent nurse injectors. There are also many bad ones. It is not about title but rather knowledge (or facial anatomy) and training (the best injection techniques).

Finally, in the state of California, even though nurses are allowed to inject Botox under the guidance of a physician, the initial exam cannot be administered by a nurse because Botox is a prescription. The initial "good faith" exam must be provided by a nurse practitioner, Physician assistant or physician because Botox is a prescription and must be authorized by a practitioner that is allowed to prescribe.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox or Dysport injector

+1

Laws vary by state.

Some states may only allow physicians to inject medications such as Botox or Dysport, as it's a medical procedure and not the same as giving a medication (like a flu shot). Other states require the physicians to be present, while a nurse or physician-assistant perform the actual injection. Some states allow non-physicians to practice this form of cosmetic medicine without physician oversight.

Also, some of these cosmetic injections are performed by such physicians as obstetricians, anesthesiologists, and primary care physicians. Check with your state's medical board, and ask questions.

Houtan Chaboki, MD
Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Do you want a nurse or board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon to perform Botox injection?

+1

Whether or not a registered nurse, nurse practitioner or a physician assistant can perform Botox or Dysport injection is dependent on your State medical regulatory bodies. A better question is would you want to make investment of your complexion in the hands of a mid-level provider or a board-certified dermatologist or plastic surgeon.

William Ting, MD
Bay Area Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

In Florida, Botox cannot be legally injected by a nurse

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This is a question many medical boards are being asked. You must check your state's medical board for their opinion on this.

I recently reviewed the opinion of the Florida Medical Board of Medicine and they declared injecting Botox as a "Medical Procedure." Therefore, only Physicians, PAs, and Nurse Practioners can inject Botox Cosmetic. If anyone else is doing the injections, they are practicing medicine without a license and can be prosecuted.

Steven F. Weiner, MD
Panama City Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Go to an experienced doctor for Botox injections.

+1

Hi!

I personally feel that Botox injections should be performed only by a Board certified plastic surgeon or dermatologist. Anatomical knowledge and skill are required to get a good result and avoid complications.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.