Can Your Sinuses Be Injured, Cut or Brused During a Face Lift?

Watching the procedure on You Tube it looks pretty rough. Also, how do they avoid cutting eye during the eye lift surgery. I'm thinking of having upper and lowers done.

Doctor Answers (22)

Bruised sinuses during the face left

+2

 Facelifting Involves tightening the facial muscles, skin removal of the face  and fat removal in the neck area. Face and neck lift surgery will not affect the sinuses whatsoever. This endoscopic sinus surgery is performed through the nose with  endoscopes to open up diseased sinuses.  Blepharoplasty surgery involves removal of fat above and below the eyelids and excess skin removal as well.  The eyeball is not  operated upon during the procedure.  Facial plastic surgeons have extensive knowledge of the anatomy of these structures  and usually perform safe and consistent results.


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

Facelift

+2

It would be unusual for the sinuses to be injured during a facelift surgery.  A surgeon with a strong knowledge of the anatomy will prevent damage to the eyes during eyelid lift surgery. Please consult with a board certified specialist who can help you achieve the results you desire.

Kimberly Lee, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Can Your Sinuses Be Injured, Cut or Brused During a Face Lift?

+2

The sinuses are not involved in any way in a facelift procedure. Experience and knowledge of anatomy prevent inadvertent injuries to the eyes during eyelid surgery. For the best and safest possible outcome, seek a facial surgery expert for your desired procedures. I hope this information is helpful.

Stephen Weber MD, FACS

Weber Facial Plastic Surgery

Stephen Weber, MD, FACS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

You might also like...

Cosmetic Surgery is an art and a science

+2

Thank you for the question. Your sinuses are deeply located inside your bone structure. After 30 years of practice, I have not heard of such an injury. Best wishes for a good result..Dr Thomas Narsete Austin, Tx

Thomas A. Narsete, MD
Greenwood Village Plastic Surgeon

Facelift and eyelid lift procedures are controlled

+2

Undoubtedly the facelift and eyelid lift procedures require the operating surgeon to have a comprehensive knowledge of anatomy as well as a detailed plan for improvement of the structures, which have been identified as being problematic, preop.  There are at least 3 variations of facelifts: a) skin only, which is most prone to relapse, for obvious reasons.  The skin has the ability to stretch and relax. b) SMAS (submuscular aponeurotic system) procedures, tighten and reposition fatty areas overlying muscles of facial expression to more optimal position, while avoiding important nerves and vessels; c) subperiosteal, in which the entire SMAS and facial skin envelope is elevated off the facial skeleton and fixated.  Most PS will justify which technique is recommended during your consultation, based on your anatomy and desired outcomes.  The globe or eyeball is at risk, particularly during lower lid surgery, however this is why the procedure is usually conducted with efforts to protect it with ophthalmic ointments, contact lenses and even temporary suture of the eyelids.  Choose your PS well and you will have a safe passage.

Lavinia Chong, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Can Your Sinuses Be Injured, Cut or Brused During a Face Lift?

+1

 Facelifts dissect the tissues, of the face that are well above the facial bones.  Sinuses are located deep within these facial bones, of the cheek, sides of the orbits and forehead...these would not be affected by a facelift.  Facelift surgery is an elegant technique and should not appear "rough", especially the minimal incision, limited tissue-dissection variants that are the very popular today.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Sinus injury during facelift surgery.

+1

The only facelift procedure that comes significantly close to the paranasal sinuses is a dual access sub-periosteal midface lift performed through both the temporal fossa and the oral cavity.  Eye injury during eyelid surgery is prevented with the use of eye shields and careful technique.

Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS, FRCSC, FACS.

Mario J. Imola, MD, DDS
Denver Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Sinuses not at any risk during facelift surgery

+1

The sinuses are encased within the facial bony structures and are not at any risk during a facelift.  For lower eyelid surgery, most surgeons will use protective eye shields that are like heavy contact lenses, which effectively protect the eye. For upper eyelid surgery, the upper eyelid is closed, providing a protective covering for the eye.

Thomas A. Mustoe, MD, FACS
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 19 reviews

Sinus safety with Facelift surgery

+1

You do not need to be concerned at all about your sinuses when undergoing a facelift.  The sinuses are inside the central bones of the face and therefore are well protected.  More common structures to protect during the procedure are the nerves and muscles of the face.  Your plastic surgeon will watch and protect these structures durign the procedure.

As for a blepharoplasty,  there are several layers of tissues between the skin and the eyeball.  Surgeons are always careful to go layer by layer in rejuvenating the lids, protecting the eye at all times.

Make sure you see a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon whose competency and safety has been assured by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

Gilbert Lee, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Your sinus are safe

+1

Your sinuses are beneath the bone of your facial skeleton and are not at risk of damage during facelift surgery.   Nerves overlying the sinuses may be bruised and overlying tissue is swollen which could give an altered sensation  that could be idenified with sinus discomfort.  This is an unusual finding.

 

A goo surgeon protects the eyes during blepharoplasty surgery to minimize the risk to the eye.  Direct orbital injuries during blepharoplasty is a rare event. 

Lee Kleiman, MD
Annapolis Facial Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.