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Can the Incision on a TT Be Short and Just Above the Pubic Hair, Centered and Not Reaching the Hips?

Is a short, low incision for TT, just above pubic area possible? About 4 to 6 inches

Doctor Answers (12)

Tummy Tuck Scar Menu

+1

No two lower abdomens are the same and therefore no two abdominoplasty designs are the same. The amount of skin that you have will determine if you need a mini, full, floating, extensive, extensive with flanks or circumferential. As you can see the menu of options is as diverse as presentations are. It is best to be examined by a qualified plastic surgeon to see if a shorter scar is possible. Also, in 15 years of doing thousands of abdominoplasties I have learned some serious lessons. One of the most poignant is that results should never be compromised for the length and size of the scar. What is more important is the position of the scar and placement in a low area of your pubic/abdominal junction.


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Short incision Tummy Tuck

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It is possible to have a short incision tummy tuck, in which the incison is just above the pubic hair and does not extend to the hips.  To determine if this type of tummy tuck would be a good option in your case, would require a physical exam.  Best wishes.

Vincent D. Lepore, MD
San Jose Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Short Scar for Tummy Tuck? #tummytuck

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This depends on if you need a full tummy tuck or a mini-tummy tuck. Very few people qualify for a mini tummy tuck. This is a question that is best answered after a direct physical exam or if you post pictures. If you have any skin or muscle laxity above the belly button you likely need a full tummy tuck requiring incisions from hip to hip.

Richard J. Brown, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

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Can the Incision on a TT Be Short?

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My shortest ever is seven to eight inches.  A four to six inch scar limits the amount of improvement that can be accomplished above the belly button (waist level).  Positioning scar low is always possible, but sometimes, depending on other features of abdominal surface anatomy, this necessitates an additional small scar between belly button and escutcheon.  A short scar also may mandate scalloping or rippling along the scar if there is a large amount of loose skin.  If ripples persist, secondary revision of the scar months after your initial procedure may be necessary to improve the contour.

Steve Laverson, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Tummy tuck incision length

+1

Great question.  The length of a tummy tuck scar depends entirely on the amount of excess skin that you have.  If your excess skin is central and not extensive a shorter scar might be appropriate.  I would defer to an in person consultation.  Best of luck.

Christopher J. Davidson, MD, FACS
Wellesley Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Can the Incision on a TT Be Short and Just Above the Pubic Hair, Centered and Not Reaching the Hips?

+1

    A short scar tummy tuck can have the same length scar as the minitummy tuck but will remove about twice as much skin as well as allow tightening of the abdominal wall.  This may be appropriate in your case.  Find a plastic surgeon with ELITE credentials who performs hundreds of tummy tucks each year.  Then look at the plastic surgeon's website before and after photo galleries to get a sense of who can deliver the results.

Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 218 reviews

Tummy Tuck or Abdominoplasty Incision

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The amount of excess skin typically determines the length of the incision required to remove that excess skin. As a general rule, a short incision only allows a small amount of skin removal. A longer incision and resulting scar (as in a full tummy tuck) will allow the surgeon to remove more skin and tighten the entire abdominal wall.  This is the important thing to consider when looking at this type of surgery. Don't compromise the results with a shorter scar if it won't deliver the results you want. A consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon with an expertise in tummy tucks and body contouring should be able to show you what you can expect. Good luck!

M. Dean Vistnes, MD
Bay Area Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Can the Incision on a TT Be Short

+1

This is a common question. The length of the incision determines how much skin can be removed. If you want a very small incision, then you can have a very small amount of skin removed, maybe 2-4". Most patients that have a TT have all of the skin from lower than the pubic hairline to higher than the bellybutton removed. that is a hip to hip scar. The incision should NEVER be at the hairline because it always rides up after the surgery.

Ronald V. DeMars, MD
Portland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Short incision for abdominoplasty

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If the degree of abdominal skin laxity can be addressed with a 4-6 inch incision, you most likely don't require a standard tummy tuck. Maybe a mini-tummy tuck would address your concerns if you only have a bit of protuberance from lower abdominal muscle laxity and not a lot of excess abdominal skin. Consult with several plastic surgeons in your local area to determine which type of surgery would provide you with the best results. Thank you for your question. Best wishes.

Gregory Park, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Short scar tummy tuck.

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The ideal length of scar depends on the degree of skin excess.  Limiting the scar length but leaving loose skin is generally not desired by the patient.

The ideal patient for a very short scar would have very little loose skin, limited to the lower central abdomen with abdominal muscle separation limited to the lower abdomen. 

York Jay Yates, MD
Salt Lake City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 50 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.