Replace McGhan Anatomical Textured Overs to Silicone Under the Muscle?

Hi Doctors! In 2001, I had implants placed over the muscle by a fantastic surgeon but unfortunately I found out he passed away. After having kids my breast shrank and became saggy but not saggy enough for a lift . My implants are textured 380cc anatomicals. I do have rippling when I bend over and I also want to go a little smaller. I am 5'3" and 125 lbs and I think I look a little too big up top. After 12 years, can I go under the muscle with silicone implants? ( I probably need a lift)

Doctor Answers (6)

Breast implant change

+1

Your case illustrates why I never thought anatomic, textured implants were a good idea, especially over the muscle.  They always ripple.  Switching to under the muscle is a good des and a lift can be done at the same time if you need it.    It is not, however, a simple procedure and you need to choose a surgeon with a lot of experience with revision breast surgery.


San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Replace McGhan Anatomical Textured Overs to Silicone Under the Muscle?

+1

I would place the smooth gel implants in the sub-fascial position

If rippling persists, fat grafting is beneficial

Hilton Becker, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Implant exchange

+1

If you have rippling it is oftena good idea to have more soft tissue coverage over the implant. Under the muscle will help in the upper pole. Strattice can be used for the lower pole.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

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Changing Breast Implants

+1

Yes, you can change your anatomic textured implants for smooth implants. This will help with the rippling. Placing them under the muscle will also help, although neither may eliminate the problem. Since you have lost volume and are wanting to be smaller, you will probably need a lift at the same time. This operation is actually harder than your original. Since you have list your previous excellent surgeon, look for a board certified. plastic surgeon with significant experience in breast revision surgery.

Robert T. Buchanan, MD
Highlands Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Over to under

+1

It is clear you are doing your research. The placement of the implant under the muscle with a lift is the right treatment plan for you. As the breast ages it sags but you also lose upper pole volume. The rippling you are experiencing is caused by volume loss and increased visibility of the implant.

Placing the implant under the muscle adds volume to the upper pole by covering it with muscle but it also decreases the risks of capsular contracture.

Seek out a board certified plastic surgeon to discuss this with you in more detail. Good luck and I hope this was helpful.

Robert W. Kessler, MD, FACS
Corona Del Mar Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 84 reviews

Breast implant revision

+1

Hi,

Thank you for your question. However, it would be helpful if you would submit photographs to asses your problem.

In general, it is always best to place implants under the muscle (better support, less complications with rippling, contractures, etc). I would also assume you will need a lift, so with that said, you might consider a lift with minimal scars such as the Mini Ultimate Breast Lift. This is a technique that only requires an incision around the areola, no need for a vertical scar. This is not a Benelli, as the Benelli is very limited to how much lift can be achieved. The Mini UBL uses the same strapping technique used in the full UBL to lift, reshape and permanently anchor your existing breast tissue directly over the implant to achieve a natural and perky apperarance. Look into it.

Hope this helps,

Dr. H

Gary M. Horndeski, MD
Texas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 123 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.