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Can excess upper or lower lateral cartilage be removed and used to build up other areas of nose deficient in cartilage?

Can cartilage be taken from over sized upper lateral cartilage and be placed for instance to support deficient lower lateral or medial cartilage or vice versa? Or is there advantages using the septal quadrangular cartilage or concha ear cartilage instead? Is there a difference in rigidity of septal quadrangular cartilage vs alar cartilages?

Doctor Answers (3)

Excess upper and lower lateral cartilages used for grafting in rhinoplasty

+1
In our practice, we frequently use excess upper or lower lateral cartilages to build up other areas of deficiency in the nose during the rhinoplasty procedure. The lower lateral cartilages tend to be much thinner  and are used when only a small amount of augmentation is needed. Ear cartilage is only used when all of the nasal cartilage has been depleted from the nose from previous surgery.  For many examples of rhinoplasty cartilage grafting, please see  the link below


Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

Can excess upper or lower lateral cartilage be removed and used to build up other areas of nose deficient in cartilage?

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      The quality of the cartilages involved can be extremely variable as can the amount available for harvesting.

Kenneth Hughes, MD

Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 238 reviews

Cartilage Repositioning in Rhinoplasty Surgery

+1
Cartilage removed from the upper and lower lateral cartilages can be used to increase volume in other parts of the nose. If support is needed, cartilage from the septum and/or ears will be better than the weaker alar and upper lateral cartilages.  

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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