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Feel Run Down After Surgery..

9 days ago I had surgery and I am wondering if this is "normal recovery". I had a face and neck lift, brow lift, rhinoplasty, dermabrasion to upper lip, fat transfers to NL folds. Yesterday I was feeling better so I had a shower and washed my hair cleaned up my room, and bathroom, went out for dinner with some friends for 3 hours. Later I felt like I was run over by a truck. I felt nauseated, in pain, stiff and just run down. How long should recovery take? Thanks for your answers Terrie

Doctor Answers (18)

Expect to feel tired for 4-6 weeks after multiple face procedures

+4

Thank you for your question.  You have had a very complex series of multiple facial rejuvenation procedures in addition to your face lift.

Generally speaking any procedure that requires longer than 2 hours of general anesthesia can make you feel tired for several weeks.

And your case he had a very complex series of multiple facial procedures and I would expect you to feel the way you describe during at least the first 2 weeks and possibly longer.  You should be resting and not engaging in strenuous activity or extensive social activity for 3-4 weeks.

Please consult your plastic surgeon and follow his or her advice.


Boston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Wound at Rest Heals Best

+2

You way, way over did it.  Wounds and bodies need recovery time.  You are still in the embryonic stages of recovery.  It is normal to feel easy fatigue for 6 weeks.  Remember wound healing takes 1 year and at 6 months you are only 80% there.  You had massive surgery and you wonder why yo are fatigued.   Be calm and rest.  You should get 10 hours of sleep a night.  You should take a nap in the afternoon for one hour.  You need to eat well and at home.  It is impossible to go to a restaurant and avoid salt and fat.  Salt will increase your pain and fatigue level.  You should drink very little alcohol if any.  You should not smoke or be around smoke.  Take one a day mutivitamins.  Avoid stress and confrontation.   Gentle exercise only.  Walking is great.  Running at this point is not acceptable.  Do you see what I am saying.  You better calm down and let your body heal.  My Best.  Dr C

George Commons, MD
Palo Alto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

Postop Lassitude

+1

Hello Terrora-

As you probably already know, being four months postop, your energy levels will return to normal about 1.5-2 months after more extensive surgery (like you had). If you are still feeling run-down at this time, then consult with your doctor. 

All the energy that you normally have for feeling good and being active goes towards healing in the immediate postop period, which is why one starts to get tired in the early afternoon after surgery. 

I hope all is well now and that you are enjoying your changes.

Mark Anton, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

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Facelift Recovery

+1

It is normal early on after a facelift and/or a facelift with multiple procedures to feel run down.  There is a physical component to healing, but especially with a facelift there is an emotional component as well.  Most patients in my practice who experience this "underwater" feeling early on and feel good by day 7.  However, each individual has a unique healing experience which may take longer.

Anil R. Shah, MD
Chicago Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 65 reviews

After a facelift patients can feel a bit rundown.

+1

Mild depression commonly accompanies any significant operations which includes facelift. This will improve with time.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Yes, it will take some time to get 100% back to normal

+1

Hello,

Thank you for the question.  What you describe is not uncommon.  As we feel a little better we tend to do more and realize that put body is still in recovery mode.  Try and keep activities short for now.  Things will be better each week.

All the best,

Dr Remus Repta

 

Remus Repta, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 81 reviews

Feel run down after surgery.

+1

Dear Terrora, 

Thank you for your question.  It sounds like you had quite a bit of surgery!  It is common to feel this way after extensive surgery, as your body is using most of its energy to heal your face. This leaves less energy for you for general purpose.  Thus, you feel 'run down'.  This will go away as you heal.  

Best Wishes, 

Pablo Prichard, MD

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Feel run down after surgery...

+1

Surgery is a type of stress for the body and there is a recovery process taking place especially the initial first weeks. It is normal to feel run down after any type of surgery.  It is important to decrease the amount activity, pain medication and keep yourself hydrated.

S. Ozan Sozer, MD
El Paso Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Feeling run down after surgery

+1

  It sounds like you may be trying to do too much too soon after surgery.  Nine days after the extensive procedure having dinner with friends for 3 hours that you had may be "pushing it" a little.  Give yourself a little more time and I think that all will be fine.  Good luck with your recovery!

Lawrence Kass, MD
Saint Petersburg Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Feeling run down | tired after face lift and rejuvenation procedures 9 days after your procedure

+1

This is normal. You will have 20% healing at 2 weeks, 60% at 6 weeks, 90% at 6 months. Make sure to drink a lot of fluids. This could be one reason you are tired. Make sure that you are getting enough nourishment. I would check your vitals and also consider visiting your primary care doctor to see if they could help too.
 

Philip Young, MD
Bellevue Facial Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 29 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.