Scar revision 8 months post Tummy Tuck. (photo)

I had a tummy tuck back in July and the scar is straight and thin but about a inch above my preference. I do have some skin now that it has been 8 months post op was and wondering what a scar revision to lower it would consist of before I go that route? What are the drawbacks? Would it be worth it? I am really uncomfortable with how long my pubic area looks and short my waist now appears. Thanks!!!!

Doctor Answers (8)

Scar

+1
Your scar appears in an acceptable position.  There is still some redness which indicates the scar is still maturing.  Tattoo camouflage will be helpful once the scar lightens somewhat.  Lowering the scar is probably not the best option.  Good luck! 


Atlantic City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Abdominal scar position

+1
You position is already quite low and it is also basically set.   Any attempt to lower will simply pull up  your pubis and associated tissue.  There are limits to these procedures and you are there......at the limit.   Work on the scar with Kelocote or similar silicone gel.  Time is the great healer and your scar should be quite minimal with time.  My Best,  Dr C

George Commons, MD
Palo Alto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Tummy tuck scar

+1
  • A high scar is hard to reset,
  • Your scar will continue to improve with time,
  • It may have started out low - pulling tummy skin very tight can pull a scar up,
  • Laser treatments may help to fade it - but time and sometimes silicone scar gel may help. Best wishes.

Elizabeth Morgan, MD, PhD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

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Scar revision 8 months post Tummy Tuck.

+1
An attempted scar lowering revision could fail... Best to either accept the result or tattoo it with a decorative design... 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
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Abdominoplasty Scar

+1
Thank you for the picture.  Your scar placement is unfortunately set.  There is little to do about in short of placing tissue expanders above the scar to gain extra tissue to lower the scar at a second surgery.

Dr. ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Abdominoplasty Scar Revision

+1
One may do an  abdominal scar revision but the extend of laxity in the skin determines how low the scar may be relocated.  I cannot assess the laxity of the skin by looking at your picture. A scar revision may be performed under local anesthesia.  The procedure is much less invasive than your initial tummy tuck.
You may call my office with any questions.
Thank you.

Nana Mizuguchi, MD
Louisville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Tummy tuck revision for scar lowering

+1
Thank you for your question.

Sometimes, especially in short waisted individuals, it is difficult to get the scar low without leaving a short vertical component. The trade off is a slightly higher scar.

Your scar is only 8 months old and is still red, which means that it is still maturing. Tummy tuck scars take about 1 to 1 1/2 years to mature.

Honestly, it is difficult to lower the central tummy tuck scar but it can be done if you have developed sufficient laxity of the lower abdominal skin. It sounds like you may have some more laxity so it is possible.

To be sure, see two or more board certified and experienced plastic surgeons in your area for a full and complete evaluation.

I hope this helps.

J. Jason Wendel, MD, FACS
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

No scar revision for you

+1
Some folks just don't have enough loose skin in their upper abdomen at the time of a TT to have as low a scar as they want. They need to just accept that this is them. Trying to lower your scar really won't work and by trying to it will be tighter and will likely spread wider and look worse. Just give it time and yours will fade nicely since you have fair colored skin. 

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 51 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.