Why Do I Have a Bump Inside Right Nostril and Why Did I Develop a Deep Wrinkle Under my Nose when I Smile?

I had open rhynoplasty a year ago, the surgeon lifted my tip and did an alar base reduction. Unfortunately, I have a bump on the inside of my right nostril that feels hard like cartilage. Also, every time I smile I have developed a crease under my nose that looks very unflattering. The surgeon has recommended to remove the extra cartilage but I'm hesitant to go to him to make this correction. Why has that crease/ wrinkle under my nose develop? And what can I do to correct it?

Doctor Answers (3)

Rhinoplasty and minor revision surgery

+1

Dear Alicew,

  1. The crease is likely from a strut that extends to the upper lip (it lifts the tip and supports it)
  2. The small bump on the inside of the nostril could be cartilage
  3. Both of these are pretty easy to fix with a small revision and if it bothers you, then you should probably have the small procedure to fix it

Best regards,

Nima Shemirani
 


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Bump Inside Nostril and Crease when I Smile

+1

It is difficult to explain without examining your nose but consult with another rhinoplasty surgeon if you do not want a minor revision by your surgeon.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Horizontal Crease after Rhinoplasty

+1

What you're seeing under your nose is not highly unusual and is occasionally  troubling for patients. We think it is caused by swelling and/or stiffness of the area following surgery, and can last from several months to even a year. Conservative injection of botox in the area may help reduce this temporarily as it resolves. As far as the extra cartilage, your surgeon should  know how to address this and hopefully will be a minor touchup.

Roy A. David, MD
San Diego Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 20 reviews

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