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Would a Bulbous Nasal Tip Reduction Be Successful for Me?

As you can see, my nose sticks out considerably further than my chin (I don't want a chin implant). Would getting a tip reduction help this? Also, it points downward when I smile and it makes me very self conscious when smiling. Would it fix this? I got a rhinoplasty done just to remove a small hump on the bridge of my nose about seven months ago but there was no work done to the tip of my nose because I've been afraid it would come out looking "pinched". What do you think? Thank you so much!

Doctor Answers (11)

Chin Augmentation or Nose Surgery

+1

Your nose, overall, looks nice.  The tip could be slightly narrowed (refined) and rotated up, just a little.  The projection is good.  I can guarantee that if you deprojected it (brought the tip closer to your face) you would not be happy.  The chin is definitely the problem here.  There are chin augmentation options that are easy, quick recovery, and even reversible.  You could even try Radiesse first, although you would need 3 or more syringes, to see how you liked it before you jumped in with both feet.  The complication rate for a chin augmentation is far lower than that for a rhinoplasty.  Is there something specific about a chin implant?  


Salt Lake City Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Is Tip Rhinoplasty Helpful?

+1

I see no aesthetic benefit to trying to change the tip of your nose. It is a little wide but otherwise has a nice shape and definitely does not point downward. You made a good decision in your first rhinoplasty to leave it alone. Your facial balance issue is your chin which adds to your accentuated facial convexity. But trying to make the tip of the nose more narrow will not change your overall look. Plus, as you have already expressed concern, there is the risk that you may see it as too narrow or pinched later.

Barry L. Eppley, MD, DMD
Indianapolis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 26 reviews

Bulbous Nasal Tip Reduction

+1

Your bulbous tip can be refined by reducing the width without causing a pinched tip. I would not decrease the tip projection to compensate for a weak chin. Then you would have a weak chin with a weak, under projected nose.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Tip reduction most likely will help you

+1

The pictures you post are some what misleading due to the fishbowl effect and the incorrect angle, a proper recomendation can only be done with a face to face examination, however it looks like a properly done tip refining surgery (open approach) with sutures will improve your tip defining points and give you the result you desire.

Victor M. Perez, MD, FACS
Kansas City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Tip or chin surgery

+1

Whiile you may not want chin surgery( and I can understand that), a tip rhinoplasty to reduce the tip projection ( which looks OK to me at least from the photo) I would not suggest. The chin is the issue in the photo.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Questionable gain from tip rhinoplasty

+1

I think that you made the right decision the first time and I see little to gain from a second procedure on the tip of your nose. Best leave things alone. You do realize that the problem with your facial convexity is with the chin, not your nose.

Best of luck,

peterejohnsonmd.com

Peter E. Johnson, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Chin-Nose Harmony

+1

Thank you for your question.  You nasal shape and projection seems good (although we don't have the ear-nose pictures).  Your nasal tip is somewhat moderately bulbous and a tip refinement procedure would make it more refined (without having a 'pinched' look if done properly).  Yet, it would not help with the nose-chin relationship.  The issue is your recessed chin.  I know you are not interested in chin surgery, so why don't you try some Juvederm/Restylane dermal filler in the area.  It is a very common procedure in my Toronto office.  I use equally Perlane and the thicker Juvederm Voluma, with amazing results.  Most patients require 3-4 ml of the fillers (each ml is 500$) and the fillers injected deep over the chin bony surface will last about 15-18 months.  It might be a good way to start and it would give you another 15-24 months to consider surgical chin augmentation.  Hope this helps!

Marc DuPéré, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Would a Bulbous Nasal Tip Reduction Be Successful for Me?

+1

  Following the proper aesthetics of facial beauty, your chin is weak as you mentioned.  This makes the entire lower face appear smaller and the nose relatively larger despite the nose being the appropriate size and shape on profile.  IMHO, the nasal tip could be refined a bit which is a far cry from a pinched, un-natural one.  This could be done using a closed Tip-plasty and would not require an entire Rhinoiplasty, IMO.  Be sure that the Rhinoplasty Surgeon, you select, understands and follows the proper aesthetics of facial beauty.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Imbalance between nose and chin - correction?

+1

Your nasal shape and projection are good. Nasal tip can be made finer, but would not fix the disproportion with your decreased chin projection. Good options for your chin would include a chin implant or advancement of your chin bone.

Frank Agullo, MD
El Paso Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Tip reduction versus chin augmentation

+1

I think that your nose projection is good and wouldn't recommend changing that. Similarly, your tip doesn't appear bulbous to me in your photos. A chin augmentation would likely improve the overall balance that you're concerned with. Rather than bring your nose in toward your chin you should bring the chin outward instead.

Thomas A. Lamperti, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.