Are my Breasts Too LOW? Stressed and Confused...

I got my BA almost 2 months ago.(275,silicone,moderate+, submuscular) And I feel like my breasts are too low. I know they are not big, but looks like implants are below my nipples. They still tell me to wear compression band above to push implants more down! And that I shouldn't wear any bras for 6 month. I feel like it should be opposite... am I wrong? Do they look OK? Should I listen to the nurse who said that in 6 month they may go up? Can somth be done to correct them?

Doctor Answers (10)

Low lying implants are not necessarily bottoming out.

+2

There are several issues here that are difficult to assess from a side view. My guess is that you had an initially low lying crease as reflected by your N-IMF distance with mild lower pole constriction. Teh use of the band by your surgeon and nurse is probably to promote lower pole expansion. However, as you have indicatied, it wil make your breasts appear even lower. A larger implant may correct this if your N-IMF is less than 7-9 cm, in my opinion only.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 48 reviews

Re: Are my breast implants too low?

+2

It is a very important during the initial consultation to evaluate the distance between the base and nipple areola complex and the inframammary crease. Ideally that should fall between 5.0cm – 7.0cm depending on the initial size of the breasts. In your case, if that distance was on the higher end, then even the slightest lowering of the inframammary crease and your utilization of a relatively small prosthesis would result in disproportion projection of the lower pole. This appears to be the case in your lateral post op photo and I would not do anything to further accentuate the downward dissent of the prosthesis and wearing an underwire bra would certainly be appropriate. If in six months you are unhappy with the position of the prosthesis the easiest solution is to put in a somewhat larger prosthesis which has a greater height and base width. This would give you a more superior fill. If the distance from the areola to the inframammary crease is too excessive, then internal capsulorrhaphy would be the only solution which is a somewhat complicated procedure. 

William F. DeLuca Jr, MD
Albany Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 118 reviews

Stop wearing the " compression band"

+2

Clearly the implants will not go up!  Unless you get a capsular contracture with distortion.   I agree that we need better pre and post op photos to comment.   They do appear to have some fall out but I cant be sure.   If you  dont like them then you should have them fixed.  They are not going up ! 

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 74 reviews

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Low Riding Breast Implants

+2

I agree from this picture that the implants look low.  A couple of different picture angles would be helpful.  Some surgeons would recommend and underwire bra to help reposition the implants.  At this point I do not think that strategy would hurt and may help.  Most likely you may need a revision.

Dr. ES

Earl Stephenson, Jr., MD, DDS
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
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Breast Implant Malposition

+2

I am going to have to agree with your assessment. The breast does look bottom-heavy, however, it could be related to pre-operative appearance, breast augmentation makes you a larger version of yourself. I would not use the bandeau over the top, and I rarely use them in my practice. I also recommend underwire bra support to stabilize the lower and lateral aspect of the breast pocket as the breasts are healing.

Hayley Brown, MD
Las Vegas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

Are my Breast Implants Too LOW?

+2

Regarding: "Are my Breasts Too LOW? Stressed and Confused...
I got my BA almost 2 months ago.(275,silicone,moderate+, submuscular) And I feel like my breasts are too low. I know they are not big, but looks like implants are below my nipples. They still tell me to wear compression band above to push implants more down! And that I shouldn't wear any bras for 6 month. I feel like it should be opposite... am I wrong? Do they look OK? Should I listen to the nurse who said that in 6 month they may go up? Can somth be done to correct them
?"

For the most part, the pocket developed for the implant largely determines the position / location of the implant on the chest and in relation to the nipple. Time and gravity do expand the lower pole of the breast somewhat but do not take the place of an accurately dissected implant pocket.

Having not examined, I am no position to contradict the instructions given to you but your surgeon in Korea. However, based on your photograph I would share with you my thinking in cases such as yours.

At the present time, the implant appears to be exactly behind the nipple with equal parts above and below the nipple. That is where it should be located. I do not believe in the Medieval practice of using compression straps and am sure Tomás de Torquemada would found it an amusing toy.
- If the pocket was dissected properly, it is not needed
- if the implant is position right behind the nipple, it is not needed

I am guessing it is still used here either because the nurse dos not understand the aesthetic goal of breast augmentation or because your surgeon is trying to expand the lower pole of the breast (which is still a straight line instead of a convex line).

If the implants are located where we want them to be (and they are) you can start wearing a bra, for which you were fitted, to slow and stop further inferior movement of the implant and to prevent breast sagging.

In other words, you are partially right. I would recommend you start wearing a bra.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 66 reviews

Refrain from lowering them any more

+1
The breast has a very natural look, although the nipple is a little high on the breast projection from the side.  The outcome is dependent on your preoperative anatomy.  I would not attempt to lower them at this point though.  I don't think they need correction.

Gary Lawton, MD, FACS
San Antonio Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Low Breasts Following Augmentation

+1

         It’s very difficult to evaluate   this problem with an isolated lateral photograph.  Your lateral picture suggests that a large percentage of your breast volume is located below the level of the nipple areola complex.

 

         In the short term, the use of an upper breast bandeau should be discontinued.  This device forces the breast implants inferiorly   which can accentuate the current deformity.  It would be appropriate to use an underwire bra, this would stabilize the inframmammary fold and possibly shift the breast implants in a superior direction.

 

         If this problem persists beyond six months, surgery will probably be necessary.  This might require something simple, like replacing your current implant with a larger one. It may require a larger procedure where the inferior breast pocket is elevated into a normal position.

 

         It’s important to discuss these issues with your plastic surgeon.  At this point conservative management is indicated but surgery may ultimately be necessary.

 

         

Richard J. Bruneteau, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 89 reviews

Breast Augmentation

+1

They are unlikely to go up.  Can you post better pics including frontal view pics so that we can provide better advice to you?

Best,

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Low implants

+1

Thank you for the photo. Yes it appears that your implants are a bit low. I would stop wearing a compression band and wear a bra when ever you are up and about. I never use compression bands and always have my patients wear a bra after surgery. Also, pectoralis exercise can aggravate this situation. You should really discuss your concerns with your plastic surgeon. Good luck.

Steven L. Ringler, MD, FACS
Grand Rapids Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.