Can my Breasts Grow After Augmentation?

One year ago, at 17, I had my breasts augmented from an A to a C cup. When speaking with mum (before the operation) she advised me that her breasts did not start significantly growing until she was around 18-19. I am not sure whether she told me this to persuade me to hold off on the surgery until I was a bit older, but it also makes me question whether my breasts are able to grow after my implants? I am 18 now, and have noticed they are fuller and softer since surgery - is this just natural?

Doctor Answers (9)

Can my breasts grow after surgery?

+3

To answer your question, it really depends.  You can theoretically have additional growth in the size of your breasts for the next few years or...you could have no change at all.  Given your age, I would say that there is a likelihood that your cup size may change but there is no way to accurately predict that. 

This is why the option of breast enhancement is a difficult decision for patients in their teen years.  There are concerns both ways in that placement of implants may negatively impact your breast development (and ulltimately impede further breast development) as well as concerns that your long-term results may change drmatically if there is continued growth. 

That being said, there is really no way to tell you either way and only time will tell.  If your breasts do develop and you are concerned about your cup size being too large, there is always the option of downsizing the implants. 

 

I hope that helps!


Denver Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 2 reviews

Breasts growing after augmentation?

+2

Breast development may not end until you are 18-20 years old.  Your breast size can change well after that age, though. Weight fluctuations and pregnancy are the most common reasons for breast size changes over time.  Your augmentation will not affect breast growth.

Carmen Kavali, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Breasts can grow into 20s

+1
It wouldn't be surprising if your breast have increased in size at your age.  For this reason doing a breast augmentation at this age is not recommended unless there is a very clear reason for doing so.  In our clinic we discuss the potential for breast growth with our younger patients and recommend waiting until they are older.

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 159 reviews

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Yes, it is possible

+1
It is possible that your breasts will continue to grow after your surgery. Natural tissue expansion occurs following surgery to accommodate the presence of the implants, and this is probably why your breasts feel fuller and softer. Your breasts may also be affected in shape/size by weight fluctuations, pregnancy and aging.

Jerome Edelstein, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 63 reviews

Breast Growth

+1
Dear kuity519,
In general, breasts will stop 'growing' when all other hormone related phenomenon from puberty stop changing. Some women have early puberty and early finishing of these changes, and some women have later and a more prolonged course. However, any changes to hormone levels, such as in pregnancy, nursing, etc. can change breasts, OCP may change growth, certain tumors may affect growth, weight gain will affect size, etc. The breast is composed of the breast gland that grows related to hormone levels of estrogen and prolactin as well as other hormones, but some women's breast tissue have more 'hormone receptors' than other women's and thus are more sensitive to hormone levels. That is why the hormone creams etc do not work on someone who naturally have smaller breasts because they are less sensative to hormones. In addition, the breast is also composed of fat tissue which grows and shrinks with weight gain and loss. So there is no simple answer here. It sounds like your mother had a later and longer puberty.  You may have a similiar course.  Only time will tell. I would suggest waiting until you are a little older before making any decision about breast augmentation.
Best Wishes!
Pablo Prichard, MD

Pablo Prichard, MD
Phoenix Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Breast augmentation and growth

+1

Your breasts may or may not grow beyond the age of 17. Even at an older age your breasts may change due to weight gain or pregnancy.

David E. Kim, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Breast growth after augmentation...

+1

Every woman is different in the aspect of breast growth; some young women begin at 11 years old, while others can begin in their late teens.  It's very possible for you to still experience growth at your age.  In my opinion, I would  have recommended you wait untill at least 18 years of age when your body is closer to its full developement. However, if you fear that they`ve grown too much with the addition of your implant you can always have your implant reduced or even removed.  Be sure to discuss your concerns with your surgeon.

Shain A. Cuber, MD
Edison Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Teenagers and breast implants. Better to try Victoria's Secret.

+1

With role models in the media looking buxom at 17, it's easy to think now is the time to get implants.  But I think not.  Noses, chins, ears (that stick out) are pretty much done forming and surgery is okay.  But implants at this age, when the breasts may change quite a bit in the next 4 years, is not advisable.  Try Victoria's Secret instead.  

Ritu Chopra, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Breast Growth after Breast Augmentation

+1

Breasts can grow up to age 21, during pregnancy or with weight gain. Age 17 is very early for augmentation and the FDA in the U.S.A. does not approve of augmentation until age 18 with saline implants, age 21 for gel implants.

Leo Lapuerta Jr. MD FACS

Triple Board Certified Plastic SUrgery

Leo Lapuerta, MD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.