Breast Reduction or Lift?

I am 5'2 120 pounds and am considering a breast reduction or lift. My breasts are saggy, large, and cause me considerable back and neck pain. I have about 600 cc DD in both breasts, and for my insurance to cover the reduction they require 350 cc to be removed. I would like to have perkier, smaller breasts with the least amount of scarring possible. I'm concerned 350 cc taken away would make me too small. What is my best choice in this situation, I would like some of the weight to be take away.

Doctor Answers (6)

Breast Reduction or Lift

+1

Without physical examination, you will not receive an appropriate treatment recommendation. Based on your stated objecties, you may be seeking a breast lift which would not be covered by insurance. Consult with 2 - 3 board certified plastic surgeons (who are preferably in your network) in order to understand your treatment options.


West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Breast Reduction or Lift

+1

This is a good question.  Insurance companies have guidelines regarding insurance reimbursement.  As a Plastic Surgeon, I do not like having an insurance company dictate how much tissue to take off a patient's breast.  You need to discuss this with your surgeon letting him know what size breast you want.  You may find that you are more comfortable with a mastopexy ( breast lift) and minor breast reduction.  Having said this, your insurance company may not cover your surgery. It may be a cosmetic, out of pocket expense to you.

Robert E. Zaworski, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Candidate for breast reduction surgery

+1

It is difficult to give you a firm answer without a physical examination but in general if you are symptomatic due to overly large breasts then a breast reduction would be a good option for you.  If you are a DD then reducing the breasts to a C+ size would be appropriate and should give you good proportions.   

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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Breast reduction

+1

Without an exam it is difficult to say how much tissue can be removed to leave you with a nice looking breast and reasonable volume.  350 gms per breast is less than a pound each.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Breast reduction or lift

+1
Breast volume is measured in grams, not ccs. If your insurance uses 350 grams as a standard, you are extremely fortunate. You will to see a board certified plastic surgeon in consultation who can tell you approximately what the resulting bra size would be. However, a breast reduction requires a vertical T scar. When you express the desire for minimal scarring, perkiness and not being too small, that leads to me to sense that what you are really looking for is a small reduction/lift which, while certainly feasible may not be covered by insurance. Methods of lift are dependent on a variety of factors and are individualized to patient needs.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Breast Reduction or Breast Lift?

+1

Based on your description, you may be an excellent candidate for breast reduction surgery.  Breast reduction surgery is one of the most patient pleasing operations performed  but it will behoove you to learn about the potential risks/complications associated with the procedure as well.  Scarring on the breast is a trade-off;  abnormal scarring may occur.

When patients undergo breast reduction surgery, their breasts are lifted at the same time.

You will be best served by consultation with well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons;  only after physical examination and a full communication of your goals and good advice  be provided to you. Questions such as the amount of tissue that will be  remote ( approximately) in order to achieve your goals  will be addressed at that time.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 715 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.