Breast Lift on Small Breasts, Fat Grafting, Strattice For Small Breasts?

I've asked a question about explanting & doing a lift on my small 32a/b breasts (they are now a 32d w/ implants) & I appreciate the feedback! I've seen mention of fat grafting or strattice for shaping. What do you all think of this? If you use either of these, how many sheets of strattice would you use? For fat grafting, where do you take the fat from? I'm thin, but might have a tad in my tummy. Already have a lift on one breast & scar very well. Not scared of scars. You all are so helpful! :)

Doctor Answers (4)

Breast lift after removal of implants

+2

I always try and do the most lift I can with smallest scars. It would be hard to advise you without seeing at least a photo. If you were concerned about the size of your areola, that would be one type, if you wanted to match differences another. Numerous combinations. My suggestion since you are in the area is to come in for a complimentary consultation.


Newport Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 24 reviews

Options after breast implant removal

+2

In general, if the implants used were not too big and didn't distort the breast when put in, the breast should look the way it would have looked when they are removed. This doesn't mean they haven't changed, just not because of a properly sized and positioned implant.

Putting in breast implants does not lift the breast and removing them does not make them sag. This is an illusion from the fill of the pillow-volume of the implant. In most cases I would recommend just removing the implants and then seeing what is needed/desired. 

Dermo-structural grafts like Strattice are not likely to be worth the cost in a cosmetic breast augmentation situation. Fat grafting can be considered for breasts but the techniques for this are not well standardized and there is no good long term data to prove that there is no effect on breast cancer risk. 

 

Scott L. Replogle, MD
Denver Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Implant removal

+2

It is clear you are doing your research. The reason we look to volume and lifting after removal of implants is because the skin envelope of the breast has been expanded by the implants. fat grafting is an elegant way to replace volume in the breast for modest breast augmentation or effecting shape change.Implant removal alone would not be satisfactory to most woman as the breasts will appear flat and deflated.Stratice is a dermal material used to cover and support implants and not generally used to replace breast volume.You will need to be evaluated by a board certified plastic surgeon to get a better understanding of what you willl need to achieve the results you are hoping for.Good luck and I  hope this was helpful.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert W. Kessler, MD, FACS
Corona Del Mar Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 84 reviews

Removing Implants and Lifting and Filling Natural Breasts

+2

Great Question! This is a common problem that is encountered by women that have had an augmentation in the past that they now feel is to large.I would not advise you to only do an explant and a lift. I would think that you would not like the deflated appearance of your breasts even with a great lift. Fat grafting with an explant and lift can work very well in the hands of an experienced surgeon, but your surgeon must be experienced with fat grafting and lifting, and the final size obtained will be very similar to your natural cup size, only fuller. You mentioned strattice, this is used as a "support" for smaller or larger implants and will also help "thicken" your breast tissue. It can be very useful when applied/used properly but does add significant cost, $3000 +. The best advice is to seek out a board certified plastic surgeon with lots of breast experience and have a consultation, in fact I would recommend at least three, because there will be lots of different suggestions.

Jonathan Weiler, MD
Baton Rouge Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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