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I'm 19 years old and my chest is a 34DD. Breast Lift or Reduction? (photo)

I'm 19 years old and my chest is a 34DD. My boobs have always been saggy and have stretch marks from the rapid growth. I have lost 35lbs & now my back & shoulders are constantly in more pain than ever. I was refered by an orthopedic doctor to go to physical therapy in hopes to build my back muscles to support my chest. I workout daily & love to be by the pool but wearing a sports bra or bikini top puts me in tears. Is a Lift Right for me? I dont see myself liking a reduction.

Doctor Answers (17)

Breast lift vs. reduction

+1

Depending upon the size you want to be and the density of your breasts you are more likely a candidate for a breast lift and not a reduction.  At the time of a consultation with a plastic surgeon your options can be discussed.


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Lift or Reduction

+1

From the size of you breast a small reduction would be your best choice. It would also correct the difference in size. Lifting heavy breast is full of complications like thick scars, poor healing, poor appearance, and rapid recurrence of sagging, as the reason thay are sagging is because of their weight.

Howard N. Robinson, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

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Shape the breasts

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You are certainly having symptoms of back discomfort from the large and ptotic breasts. Improving your breast shape will lift the breasts and correct the asymmetry.  The shape of the breast is determined by volume(which you have) and skin laxity (envelope of skin).

 

A breast lift with some reduction of breast tissue volume can be achieved with a mastopexy procedure. Removal of skin will help lift the breast from its current position. Visit a board certified plastic surgeon to discuss various surgical options to meet your expectations.

Many plastic surgeons are using the 3D Vectra system to help simulate how your breast may look with a lift. Otherwise before and after photos are also helpful in making  a decision to proceed with surgery.

Andrew Turk, MD
Naples Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

New option for young sagging breasts

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Thank you for your photos. You would definitely benefit from an Ultimate Breast Lift where a vertical scar would NOT be needed. Breasts are reshaped and lifted permanently on your chest. The weight of the breast is successfully transferred off your skin envelope to your chest muscles (this provides immediate pain relief to neck and back caused by heavy breasts). This technique delays the restreching of your skin that would otherwise take place with your conventional vertical or anchor lifts. A vertical scar inherently weakens a lift by placing an incision at the point of maximum tension. Ofcourse, your left breast would be reduced to match your right breast.

Kind regards,

Dr. H

Gary M. Horndeski, MD
Texas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 120 reviews

I would suggest a breast lift (mastopexy)

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From what I can see from your photographs, you would be an excellent candidate for a breast lift. With a breast lift, your breasts will be perter, your nipples repositioned higher up and your breasts will be fuller. The emptiness you have in the upper part of your breasts will be filled to give you more volume there and you will of course have less droop to your breasts.

 

A breast reduction will achieve similar results, but reduce the weight and size of your breasts, however, you are less likely to get the upper pole fullness that can be achieved with a mastopexy.

 

There is no right or wrong answer to this, and it must be a personal decision. Good luck in whatever you decide!

 

Marc Pacifico, MD, FRCS(Plast)
London Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Lift/Reduction

+1

Its difficult to view your photos, but it appears you have sagging and a volume asymmetry.  You will likely benefit from a lift and reduction to 1) reduce the heaviness of your breasts and 2) correct for the sagging to maximize your cleavage.  Please visit with a board certified PS to learn more about your options.

Dr. Basu

Houston, TX

C. Bob Basu, MD, FACS
Houston Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 114 reviews

To reduce or lift, you answered your question yourself

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when you said "I don't see myself liking a reduction". 

However, you are asymmetric so you should consider a lift on your smaller side and a limited reduction on your left side to provide a closer symmetry of your breast volume.  This is something you would discuss with your chosen plastic surgeon. 

Please be aware there are many ways to lift and reduce a breast.  Make sure the technique you are having will produce the result you desire as some surgeons have not kept up with the latest techniques that have proven to be beneficial, especially with long term results.

Curtis Wong, MD
Redding Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Breast Lifting or Reduction?

+1

Thank you for the question and pictures.

Whether breast lifting or reduction will be best for you will depend on your specific goals. Clearly your  pictures demonstrate significant breast ptosis and asymmetry and breast lifting will certainly be beneficial at some point. I would suggest in-person consultation with well experienced board-certified plastic surgeons. Ask to see lots of examples of their work and communicate your goals clearly.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 682 reviews

Breast reduction vs lift

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A breast lift will lift the breasts and maintain most of the volume.   Breast reduction will lift the breasts and remove some volume.  The incisions are usually the same.  Yours may or may not be covered by insurance for a reduction, because at least from the photos they do  not look too large.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.