Should Breast Implants Be from the Same 'Lot'?

I am currently living with a ruptured breast implant that I cannot afford to have removed privately. I have requested my medical notes from my surgery provider so that I might seek help from the NHS and note that each implant has a different 'lot' number. Is this common? Also, my surgery provider says that they are unable to provide operation/nursing notes in relation to my surgery as my surgery was 'not undertaken at one of their facilities', although this was not pointed out to me at the time.

Doctor Answers (7)

Significance of Implant Lot Numbers

+2

Lot numbers are often different for each implant and are only used for tracking and quality control purposes. All of your medical records should be available to you by contacting the specific facility and/or doctor for a period of seven years following your care by law.


Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 38 reviews

Lot Numbers and Breast Implants

+1

The current implants do not need to be from the same lot number. The lot numbers are for tracking purposes and there is no clincal important whether the implants are from the same or different lots. While useful, the lack of operative and nursing notes does not significantly alter the planning for the implant removal procedure.

Kris M. Reddy, MD, FACS
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Deflated breast implant

+1

Thank you for your question. In some occasions patent can present with a ruptured or related breast implant with no information at all. If you are going to replace both implants then your surgeon will do that by determine what implant  you need before surgery and more accurately in surgery.If you are replacing one implant then you have to have the implant information available. My question to you is when where those implants placed Over they rears the implants shape and material has change for the better. So it is beneficial for you to replace both implants and forget about lot and serial numbers.

Moneer Jaibaji, MD
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

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Deflated Breast Implant and Lot Number?

+1

Thank you for the question.

I'm sorry to hear about the difficulty you are experiencing. You should have peace of mind however that the breast implant that you have inserted to replace the deflated breast implant does not need to be of the same “lot” number.  If you are unsuccessful in retrieving information about your current breast implants, it will be important that your new “provider” have a selection of breast implants available in the operating room to replace the deflated one.

Best wishes.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 681 reviews

Significance of Breast Implant ID Numbers (Serial numbers and Lot numbers)

+1

Implant identification information (Serial number and Lot number) are intended to allow us to track the implants. Receiving implants from different lot numbers has no clinical significance. 

The UK's NHS differs from other health care systems, especially the American health care system. In most states in the US, doctors and clinics are required to keep medical records for 8-10 years after an operation.  I'm not sure what recourse you have under British law.

Peter A Aldea, MD
Memphis, TN

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 58 reviews

Lot numbers and implants

+1

The specific lot number is not important, but knowing the style of the implant and volume would be important to properly match them up.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Implant lot number not important

+1

The lot number is only used for tracking purposes, and not important to your result. Even if 2 implants are identical in size, model number and final fill volume, the 2 implants might have been made at different times in different lots. What is most important is your surgeon uses good judgment.

Victor Au, MD
Chapel Hill Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.