Breast Cut for Reconstruction?

I am having my expanders replaced with silicone implants. My current incisions are from my nipples toward my armpits. Is there a downside to making the new incisions below the breast? I am worried that additional nerves may be cut.

Doctor Answers (4)

Incisions used for the second stage breast reconstruction.

+1

Typically, I prefer to use the mastectomy incision for the exchange. Many times these scars have widened a bit and could use a revision regardless. Also, placing additional scars on the breasts would do little to improve the implant exchange and simply devascularize the skin to a certain degree.


Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Using the scar from mastectomy for implant placement is usually best

+1

The advantage of making the incision through the existing scar is that it avoids a second scar and minimizes risk of blood supply issues. Since it goes through scar there will not be any new nerves that could be affected.

Richard Baxter, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Breast Cut for Reconstruction #breastreconstruction

+1

There could be an issue with blood supply if you separate those two incisions the way you describe depending on how old they are. There are no reasons I can really think of for your surgeon not to use the old incision. It will heal well over time and offers great access to the  pocket.

 

Richard J. Brown, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 21 reviews

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Will additional nerves be cut through a fold incision?

+1

No you should not have additon nerve issues.  The insion on the side of the breast is one that typically flattens the lateral aspect of the breast but allows access to both the breast tissue and the axilla.  If you were have a cosmetic breast augmentation in many instances the most common incision used is one placed in the fold under the breast.

Robert Whitfield, MD, FACS
Austin Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.