Is it possible to have breast augmentation with cohesive gel silicone implants through an incision other that the periareolar?

I am 20 years old and have tuberous breast

Doctor Answers (5)

Implants not enough to correct shape and position of tuberous breasts

+1
Yes, the other incisions available are transaxillary and inframammary. Inframammary is the best incision since it is a direct approach to the under surface of the pectoralis major muscle. However, if you have tuberous breasts, the circumareola approach is recommended to reshape your breast tissue. Implants alone are not enough to correct the tuberous shape of your breast. Implants only change size, not shape and position of the breast mound.

Best Wishes,

Gary Horndeski, M.D.


Texas Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 129 reviews

Breaset augmentation incisions

+1
There are several options for incisions commonly used for breast augmentation. Periareolar, inframammary, and transaxillary.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Incision

+1
I prefer to insert silicone gel implants through an inframammary fold incision in the crease of the breast.  This scar hides really well in the crease of the breast after it heals. 

David C. Watts, MD
Vineland Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

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Silicon Gel implants inserted in the crease under the breast

+1
I usually insert the silicone gel implants through the crease under the breast. The suture line does not show after a few weeks and heals very nicely.
Difficult to evaluate with tuberous breasts without seeing the patient.

Guillermo Koelliker, MD
Mexico Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

BBA

+1
It is possible BUT if you have tubular breasts, you will need a peri-areolar incision to address the herniation of your areola so using another incision will just add an extra scar for no reason. 

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.