Scoliosis Breast Augmentation

I am a mid-twenties woman with mild scoliosis, which causes my left ribs to stick out further than my right. My left breast appears larger partly because of this, and partly because of the difference in volume (nearly a cup size difference: B vs. C). The left (larger) breast is also placed much more on the outside of the torso than the right. Is breast augmentation likely to solve any of these problems and give me an even look? Is it possible to achieve this by simply adding an implant to the smaller breast? Thank you!

Doctor Answers (8)

Breast asymmetry

+1

The implants can probably resolve some of the volume discrepancy, but no two breasts are exactly the same and the postion on the chest especially with scoliosis probably willn ot change.


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Breast implants will not achieve perfectly symmetrical breasts

+1

No. By themselves, breast implants hardly ever reach a perfect symmetry between asymmetric breasts.

In your case, not only are the breasts different in volume, but they apparently differ in shape and in location.

To reach the closest result to symmetry, you would probably need a breast augmentation with a lift. During a breast augmentation, the straight forward Right breast would be augmented to the desired size. The left breast would then be augmented with a temporary implant (SIZER) and its shape and location would be tailored based on various sizer volumes. Once your surgeon knows the best breast implant to place in the left breast, h/she would do so and then he/she would shape / lift the breast to match the right as much as possible.

Good Luck.

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Breast Aysmmetry and scoliosis

+1

SEE VIDEO BELOW FOR IMAGES:

There are numerous underlying skeletal problems with patients with scoliosis that effect more than just the spine which may cause the breasts to appear asymmetric.

This includes problems with vertical positioning of the breast as well as rib cage uneveness, slope of the chest, etc

The video below shows some examples of management of patients with scoliosis. Fast forward to 1min10sec.

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

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Breast asymmetry.

+1

Hi!

1) Breast asymmetry is a special interest of mine, and I have seen a number of young women with your situation.

2) Much improved but not perfect symmetry can almost always be achieved. I would encourage you, because patients are universally so happy.

3) For most women, to get the best possible symmetry I operate on both breasts. The shape can be modified, and we use different sized breast implants ( round, smooth-walled, moderate plus profile, over the muscle) for each breast.

4) Occasionally, you can just put an implant in the smaller breast, as long as the larger breast has absolutely no sagging.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Breast asymmetry and breast implants

+1

All women have breast asymmetry to some extent, either volume or shape differences or both. If you have a noticeable difference in both size and shape, due to scoliosis, a larger implant on your smaller side will help improve your asymmetry however it will not completely corrrect this. Your larger breast will always seem larger, however the implant on the smaller side will create a more symmetrical contour in clothes.

Consult with a board certified plastic surgeon and try on several different sizes until you are comfortable with your implant size.

William Bruno, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 150 reviews

Breast implants can correct volume differences

+1

No woman has perfectly symmetrical breasts. We all strive for symmetry and often come close. In you case, besides the difference in breast volume, you also have an asymmetrical chest wall, the nipples are possibly at different heights and the breast creases might be at different levels. The implant will not cover the bony chest abnormality completely. In a bra you would look more symmetrical. If you place an implant on the smaller side only, the two breasts will behave and feel differently. Without photos, it is almost impossible to make a recommendation, since this is a complex issue. Ther are a lot of things you must consider and these are best discussed in a consultation with a board certified plastic surgeon. Best of luck.

George Marosan, MD
Bellevue Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 10 reviews

Breasts implants and symmetry

+1

Sometimes breast implants can correct for volume differences between the breasts and improve symmetry. Sometimes if the bony platform is very asymmetric and if the creases below the breasts are not even and if the nipples are at different heights, an augmentation will magnify the asymmetry.

In cases like yours, I find that using a postoperatively adjustable saline implant is very useful in giving you some control over the result and modifying it for several months to get the best possible result for you.

Richard P. Rand, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 49 reviews

Can breast implants camaflouge breast asymmetry caused by scoliosis?

+1

Hi Person200.

The short answer to this is, yes. Breast implants are often used to correct asymmetry. This is especially true with respect to size; the asymmetrical position of the breast may or may not be helped.

Keep in mind that it is not possible to achieve 100% symmetry but it can be significantly improved.

Many patients requesting breast augmentation have scoliosis. The patient is often not aware of this and I always explain how scoliosis affects breast symmetry.

I almost always use implants of different sizes in these patients to correct their breast size asymmetry.

Hope this helps.

Tracy Pfeifer, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.