Have Pain on my Left Side After 5 Month and Uneven Breast. What Should I Do?

I got breast surgery augmentation. Mentor 325cc final 390cc.left side never drop.I went for second surgery.now I have pain on my left breast and left is bigger that right side.I went for second opinion and they say a nerve could be cut.They offer me to refill with saline the right side to make it even. It is this procedure the right thing to do???how can I fix my cut nerve and get away from this pain? please help me...

Doctor Answers (11)

Implant issues

+2

If the right side is smaller you certainly can have a larger implant placed. As for the pain, it is hard to predict.  This usually gets better with time. 


Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Correction of breast size after augmentation

+2

it seems reasonable to add volume or change the implant on the right side if you like the size of the left

pain issues are more difficult.. they usually slowly resolve over time.  antiiflammatories may help. there are a number of choices for these medication to take by mouth while the nerve settles down

Jed H. Horowitz, MD, FACS
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Pain post aug

+2

I would sit tight and allow a period of time to go by regarding the pain.Putting more fluid in on the one side to equalize it is fine.The pain should go away in time.i usually have patients take soem advil of the like for 2 weeks tosee if that helps.

Robert Brueck, MD
Fort Myers Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

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Breast pain and asymmetry

+2

There could be many reasons for your pain with a nerve injury being just one possibility though really not a very common one. There are many variables and a signficant lack of important information which could help diagnose and possible improve your symptoms. For example, where is the pain? What precipitates it? Are there edges of the implant poking into your skin? Are you five months after the original surgery or after the revision? Etc.

With regard to the size difference, this is quite evident and should not be a difficult issue to effectively address.

My recommendation would be to seek a 2nd opinion from 1 or more other plastic surgeons and then proceed as you feel you should.

Good luck!

Steven Turkeltaub, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
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Nerve pain after Breast Augmentation

+2

The left breast seems larger than your right.   There are no pre-op photos to evaluate.  It seems that you have had saline implants if one of the surgeons recommends re-operation to fill the right breast with more saline.   That wont improve or mitigate the pain in the left breast.  It is difficult to know whether or not a nerve is indeed cut.  For sure the nerves are probably stretched.   I dont think that it is possible to find the "cut" nerve nor do I think it is likely that a nerve has been cut.   I suspect that the nerves are stretched and are healing following the breast surgery.   It can take up to a year for for this pain to abate if it is from a neuropraxia.  There is the likelihood of a neuroma that is forming.   A damaged nerve in scar tissue can create pain.   The stretched nerve in and around the capsule can cause some pain.   Are your breasts firm?   HAve you been doing breast massage?   Often massage which can soften the capsule/ help break up scar tissue can do the trick.   Always consider revisiting your surgeon and discuss your issues with him/her.

Jonathan Berman, MD
Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Breast pain following augmentation.

+2

Many factors could be causing your pain. Most pain following augmentation occurs early and is temporary. Intermittent pains months after surgery can also occur and are often related to scar changes within the breast. Severe, constant pain is more indicative of injury to a nerve, or a severe capsular contracture. Thankfully, most neuropathies (nerve damage) will tend to improve over time. Size discrepancies can be addressed by removing saline from the larger implant, adding saline to the smaller implant.

David Bogue, MD
Boca Raton Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Pain and breast asymmetry

+2

It sounds like you have had a challenging postoperative course - I do agree that you have some asymmetry in the photos.  Your history is somewhat complicated and I don't think you are going to get the most definitive answers from this posting, because it is hard to pinpoint exactly why you have asymmetry.   I would recommend that you seek consultation from a couple board-certified plastic surgeons who can really go over your entire history and do a proper physical exam so that you can discuss what options there are.  Most patients' nerve sensations (pain, numbness, etc.)  do get betters slowly over time (many months to even years),  and it is fortunately rare that a nerve is actually cut. 

Michelle Spring, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Breast pain after a breast augmentation

+2

Breast pain after a breast augmentation could be due to several reasons, and a 'cut nerve' is only one of them.  If that is the source of your pain, it is virtually impossible to repair surgically.  I would recommend medication to sooth an irritated nerve and allow it to heal better.

To address the symmetry addingo volume to the other breast is an option (if it doesn't void warranty) or have that implant replaced with another implant.  However, you want to make sure that the source of your asymmetry IS volume difference.  Since you had additional surgery on the left side, it is possible that there was additional release that could then be performed on the right side as well (if the implant is under the muscle) which removes some of the compression and helps with the symmetry.  It is also possible that during the inflation of your saline implant the fill tube got displaced and the implant was not fully filled (and your surgeon did not realize this).

A proper examination would be helpful.  

Sincerely,

 

Martin Jugenburg, MD

Martin Jugenburg, MD
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 135 reviews

Revision Breast Surgery?

+2

Thank you for the question and pictures.

The asymmetry of the breasts that you are referring to is obvious in the pictures. I think you will benefit from revisionary surgery. Whether your current implant is filled further or a new implant is used depends on your exact circumstances and surgeon's preference.  Some surgeons feel that adding additional volume to a  breast  implant may compromise the integrity of the breast implant valve and therefore are reluctant to add additional volume.

In some cases, adding additional volume to a breast implant may increase the firmness of that implant to the point where there is a difference in the feel of the 2 breasts. In those cases use of a larger breast implant may be indicated.

Assuming you are working with a well experienced board certified plastic surgeon, I would suggest continued follow-up and communication of your goals.

I hope this helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 700 reviews

Pain after revision of breast augmentation

+2
It takes roughly a year to recover completely from a breast augmentation. Infrequently patients will develop intermittent pain in their breasts during the first year after surgery. The most common nerve issue is decreased sensation which occurs roughly 2-5% of the time. Severe, persistent pain can be a sign of a more serious issue such as capsular contracture, infection, or a neuroma. Overfilling of implants can make them inappropriately firm and in some cases can void the warranty. Your situation should be discussed in detail with a local board certified plastic surgeon with experience in cosmetic surgery.

Kelly Gallego, MD, FACS
Yuba City Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.