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How Long After Braces Can I Get Rhinoplasty?

Is there any conflict with getting braces on my teeth shortly before Rhinoplasty? I know with braces sometimes you take Tylenol the day you get them on, but I can go without that. Then you need to follow up with your dentist every 3-4 weeks with visits. Can I get Rhinoplasty one week after getting the braces put on?

Doctor Answers (7)

Coordinate braces and rhinoplasty.

+2

In some patients orthodontic tooth movment may intentionally alter lip prominence. If this change is minor it should not affect design or timing of the rhinoplasty. However, if the change is major, such as in reduction of protrusive upper front teeth, it will change the relationship between upper lip contour and prominence of the nose. In a case such as this be certain your orthodontist and surgeon have coordinated their treatment so that the outcome of the rhinoplasty is in harmony with post-orthodontic lip prominence. They may agree that the best rhinoplasty outcome will be achieved if surgery is deferred until post-orthodontic lip posture can be taken in to account.


Mercer Island Orthodontist

Braces and rhinoplasty

+1

I would recommend getting the rhinoplasty first ONLY if there is nOT going to be much movement in your teeth. If you have a big overjet or are having teeth extracted from the upper arch, then i would wait until after the braces to do the rhinoplasty.If you are going to do the rhinoplsty first, just waut 2-3 weeks for the discomfort to subside before you get your barces.

 

 

Mojdah Akhavan, DDS
San Diego Orthodontist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Rhinoplasty after Dental Work

+1

There should not be any reason that you could not undergo rhinoplasty after getting braces on. First, you should check with both your orthodontist and rhinoplasty surgeon to see if they have any concerns.

If you experience any pain with you braces, avoid taking any aspirin, aspirin-containing products, or ibuprofen for two weeks prior to your rhinoplasty as these medications can thin the blood and make you bleed more freely.

C. Spencer Cochran, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 85 reviews

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Absolutely.

+1

I would simply tell the dentist/orthodontist to be a little careful when working around the nose for the first few weeks after surgery. A bump to the nose could be painful, but it would be unlikely to harm it unless something exceptionally rough was done during one's dental visits.

Likewise, a rhinoplasty shouldn't interfere with anything the orthodontist would need to do unless it involved cramming a big tray or something in one's mouth where the top of the tray under the upper lip would put pressure on the base of the columella.

--DCP

David C. Pearson, MD
Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Rhinoplasty and Braces

+1

There should be no conflict with having a rhinoplasty procedure shortly after have braces placed. I would recommend a waiting period of a week or so to allow the inflammatory stage that occurs with the placement of braces to subside. Remember to stay away from anti inflammatory medications like Advil and Motrin for one week prior to surgery.

Andres Bustillo, MD, FACS
Miami Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 36 reviews

Proceed with rhinoplasty after braces

+1

No problem with proceeding with a rhinoplasty.  A rhinoplasty is associated with relatively minor pain.  The orthodontist will do no damage to your nose during the follow-up visits. 

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Wait a week to have rhinoplasty

+1

It is possible to have rhinoplasty surgery done one week after having orthodontic braces put on, as the two procedures will not affect each other.

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 55 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.