Worried I've Bottomed Out. Breasts Are Uneven 6 Weeks Post Op Dual Plan Aug (photo)

6 weeks ago I had my breast augmentation with 250 cc mod+ with "dual plane" tech.and from the first week I was feeling diffirent on my left breast but when I went for regular check to my PS he said everything was perfect and then I had to travel to my country and I couldn't go again for any check.. Now my left breast stays lower than the right one and at upper pole I have more fullness on my right side.. I feel like nothing is standing under my mussle on the left.I need your oppinions!

Doctor Answers (12)

Breast implants and Asymmetry

+3

Thank you for the pictures.  Your augmentation results look pretty good.  I do not think the implants are bottoming out.  They have a very natural appearance and if there is some asymmetry it appears minor to my eye.  I would not recommend anything at this point.

Dr. ES


Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

6 weeks after augmentation

+3

Many patients still have slight asymmetries at only 6 weeks post augmentation, including more fullness on one side or the other and slightly different implant positions.  From your photos, you look quite symmetric to me and I don't see any glaring problems!  (No woman's breasts are mirror images of each other, before or after surgery).   You will likely continue to notice changes for at least 3 months, and then even up to a year after surgery.   As for feeling "nothing standing under the muscle", most of the time submuscular implants are only partly covered by the pec major muscle, so the lower part of the implant is more palpable (ie, you can feel it) under your tissue, particularly in thin women. 

Michelle Spring, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Uneven breasts after implant surgery

+3

ALL BREASTS ARE UNEQUAL  with or without surgery.  Think of breasts like snowflakes, no two snowflakes are alike and no two breasts are alike. When we perform implant surgery, we do try to make the breasts as equal as possible, knowing full well we cannot make them exactly the same.

You are very early after your procedure @ 6 weeks and the implants will still change considerably.  Your photos show implants that are close in shape and size.  I would be very patient and wait at least 3-6 months and maybe even longer before you pass final judgment.  I would be surprised if you would need any revision surgery.

Good luck!

David Finkle, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 45 reviews

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Bottoming Out?

+2

Thank you for the question and pictures.

Although I do appreciate the breast asymmetry  you are referring to  I think it is too early to consider revisionary surgery. Since you're only 6 weeks out of surgery additional changing of the breasts can be expected to occur.  I would suggest reevaluation at the 6 months or one year mark.  At that point, if the left breast implant still feels “unsupported” and you have significant breast  asymmetry related to that implant malposition,  then revisioaryn surgery may  the helpful. 

Most likely what would be required is correction of inferior and/or lateral breast  implant malposition. This is corrected by “raising” the inframammary fold using internal sutures (done after careful measurements are made from the areola to the “new” inframammary fold).

I hope this helps.

Tom J. Pousti, MD, FACS
San Diego Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 707 reviews

Breast augmentation

+2

No two breasts are exactly the same!  They look pretty good in the photos to me. If you are concerned, go speak withyour surgeon and review your before and after photos.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Bottomed out post op breast augmentation?

+2

Without the benefit of an exam and pre op photos, I can only suggest that you're doing fine.  If you were "bottoming out" I would expect to see your inframammary incision ascending onto your lower breast skin which I do not see on these photos.  No breasts are symmetric pre op or post op.  My advise is enjoy your good results,  Best wishes

Craig Harrison, MD, PA
Tyler Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Assymetry

+1

Hi, most women has some sort of asymmetry.   I do believe that they will even out over time.   I would give it at least 3 months and re evaluate with you doctor.   

Good luck! 

Michael A. Fiorillo, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Uneven breasts - early in the post operative period

+1

Your breasts look fine and there is no evidence that you are bottoming out or have any other problems.  You are only 6 weeks out, give it more time before you judge your final result.  

Jeffrey Zwiren, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Bottoming out after breast implant surgery.

+1

Obviously without examining you I cannot comment on the position of the implant in terms of being under or over the muscle. I think you have a very nice result and I base this opinion on the fact that your breast implants sit relatively symmetric on your chest and the implants also sit very symmetrically on your breast crease. Bottoming out would mean your implants are dropping below the crease and I do not see this in your picture. Your incision is also sitting nicely in the fold. I would suspect your nipples were asymmetric prior to the procedure and this will persist after. You also may have some residual swelling to the upper pole of your breasts from the surgery.

Christian Prada, MD, FACS
Saint Louis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

Worried I've Bottomed Out. Breasts Are Uneven 6 Weeks Post Op Dual Plan Aug (photo)

+1

Great posted photos! I think your result is very acceptable. The differences can be addressed by an additional surgery but to what end or gain? 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
Miami Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.