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I Had a Botox Treatment in Mid Dec. Will Ulthera Still Be Just As Effective?

Would waiting give a better outcome to the Ulthera treatment. It has been 2 months since receiving the box. If the muscle is paralyzed from the Botox how would the muscle be able to lift from the Ulthera?

Doctor Answers (11)

Ultherapy and Botox

+1

Ultherapy and Botox work on completely different mechanisms.  Ultherapy targets heating deep tissue to cause new collagen formation and Botox works on muscle function .  The two work together very well to give a great non invasive treatment.


San Francisco Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

Ultherapy and botox

+1

Hi,

  Botox will not affect the Ultherapy process.  The muscle is relaxed by the botox and this is below the level of the Ultherapy target areas.

  Feel comfortable with both at any time.  Not so with fillers that are located in the treatment areas but that is another topic.

Steven M. Lynch, MD
Albany Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Botox and Ulthera

+1

Thank you for your question. Botox and Ulthera do not target the same areas in the same ways, so the Botox treatment will not affect the Ulthera treatment. You can go ahead with the treatment regardless of when you received Botox.

Daniel Shapiro, MD
Scottsdale Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 91 reviews

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Can have synergistic benefit

+1

Botox and Ultherapy work through different mechanisms.  When used in combination by an experienced provider, they can have a synergistic benefit.  It would depend on the patient, but a combination approach has produced good results in our practice.

Chang Son, MD
Fort Lee Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Botox is a great adjunct to Ultherapy

+1

Ulthera delivers heat via ultrasound to the dermis where collagen is found. The Utlherapy does not tighten muscle but it tightens the SMAS connective tissue layer above the muscle.  Botox might relax opposing muscles that normally pull down the area of interest thereby helping the Ultherapy lift even better.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Botox and Ulthera OK

+1

I do not perform Ulthera as I prefer Exilis or SkinTyte - but, Botox together with Ulthera, Exilis or SkinTyte is OK.

Robert Strimling, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Ulthera after Botox

+1

It is fine to have an Ulthera treatment after Botox.  They are great treatments to have together and compliment each other.  The Botox treatment will not affect the results of the Ulthera. Hope this helps.  Dr. Halem

Monica Halem, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
1.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Ulthera and Botox

+1

These treatments are complimentary and I often combine them in the same treatment session. If you had Botox two months ago then that should actually enhance your results with the Ulthera procedure. Good luck!

Jason R. Lupton, MD
San Diego Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Botox and Ulthera can be complementary

+1

Ulthera, which uses microfocused ultrasound to stimulate collagen regeneration, does not depend on muscle action for its effect. Botox relaxes muscles, so they can actually be complementary procedures. For example, by Botoxing the crow's feet muscle which pulls down on the outer brow, Ultherapy to the forehead doesn't have to fight against the downward pull while the collagen is remodeling.

Richard Baxter, MD
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Ulthera after Botox

+1
Ulthera and Botox are intended to operate differently. Botox is a paralytic agent. The goal of Ulthera is to tighten the skin using ultrasound, much as Thermage was designed for tightening using radio frequency. In my opinion, Ulthera has not been shown to produce satisfactory results. You may want to consider facial fillers, such as Radiesse or Restylane, instead.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.