Botox After Staph Infection and Heart Surgery?

I contracted staph bacterial endocarditis and had to have my mitral valve replaced with a tissue valve. Is it safe to continue to recieve Botox injections after you have had this? I had my surgery 7 months ago.

Doctor Answers (3)

Yes, it's safe

+1

Sorry to hear about your staph infection and valve replacement. Quite an ordeal. For surgeries it's important to take antibiotics with your valve because bacteria can be introduced through the incision.

Although the skin cannot be completely rid of bacteria with alcohol prior to Botox I don't think you need to worry about bacterial introduction. However, I can't hurt to take a dose or two of an antibiotic prior to and after the injection.


Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

You should do fine.

+1

Thank you for your question.

Botox is not an invasive procedure, and does not require any pre-injection antibiotics or any other type of prophylaxis. Assuming that the Botox is given in normal, clean office conditions, you should do fine and should not worry about getting an infection from these injections. The injections should be completely safe, and to-date, I have not even seen any injection site infections from Botox, and have not worried about systemic bacteremia or sepsis due to Botox injections.

Botox will be safe for you. However, your recent mitral valve replacement is a significant part of your past medical history and you should alert all your physicians that you have had this procedure.

Good luck!

Don Mehrabi, MD
Beverly Hills Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Botox Injections with Mitral Valve Replacement

+1

 Hi Kardwn,

You may want to consider a prophylactic dose of antibiotic before your injections of Botox.  Speak to your injecting physician about this before your treatment.

Otherwise you should be fine.  Good luck and be well.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

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These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.