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Botox to Relieve Eyebrow Heaviness After Double Eyelid Surgery - Good Idea?

Hi everyone. I am planning with a surgeon to use Botox to raise my medial eyebrow as they feel heavy after Double eyelid surgery (w/ ptosis repair). The eyebrows dropped a bit after surgery but enough for me to feel some slightly uncomfortable heaviness on my eyelid. That is what is causing an apperance of excess upper eyelid skin over my eyelids. Will a lot of botox need to be used, and I'm only 19, so excess upper eyelid skin is not a problem, right? Any alternatives? (besides revision)?

Doctor Answers (9)

Botulinum Toxin (Dysport or Botox) following double eyelid surgery

+1

I don't believe the Botulinum Toxin (Dysport or Botox) will ease the sensation of heavy eyelids after double eyelid surgery and could in fact make it worse.


Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 44 reviews

Botox after eyelid surgery

+1

if you just had your eyelid surgery, you may wish to wait a while more before the Botox because there may be swelling that makes the eyelids heavy. If your surgeon does do the Botox, they will probably give you a conservative number of units as more can be added later if needed. It is difficult to judge how many units you would need without examining you in person.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Carefully placed Botox may raise your eyebrows.

+1

I read your concern, and I think you may benefit from a Botox treatment. Frankly, I'm not sure why your brows are lower after your blepharoplasty and ptosis surgery. The effect of Botox will last for 4 months, so you may need to continue with these treatments to maintain a desired result. You may want to get another opinion from an oculoplastic surgeon.

I hope this is helpful for you.

All the best from NJ.

Eric M. Joseph, MD
West Orange Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 274 reviews

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Botox to Relieve Eyebrow Heaviness After Double Eyelid Surgery

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Very interesting question but over the internet without any posted photos impossible to give an accurate treatment plan or advise. seek 3 in person opinions. My gues is give it a try because Botox lasts only a few months. 

Darryl J. Blinski, MD
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Botox for droopy lids/brows

+1

Hooding upper eyelid skin is unusual but not impossible in a young patient.  Blepharoplasty is even more rare.  I would not hazard even a guess about Botox for you without getting to the bottom of exactly what was done, when, why, etc.

So discuss it with you doctor.  If you lack confidence in him, get an eyelid specialist.

Scott E. Kasden, MD
Dallas Plastic Surgeon
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Botox to Lift the Brows

+1

Botox is a great treatment to help modify the shape and height of the brow.  However, without examining you or seeing pictures, it is hard to give specific advice.  If you are seeing a board certified surgeon who has experience in Botox that you are likely in good hands.

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 56 reviews

Brows and surgery

+1

Hard to say without examining you.  Commonly brows drop a little after surgery on the upper lids.  Boitox may help.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

A second opinion for the doctor in training

+1

Brows can fall after eyelid surgery.  Generally it is important to balance the initial surgery to set the eyelids to balance the anticipated position of the eyebrow after double fold surgery.  The question is recognizing that brow descent occurs to some degree with every double fold surgery, why is it that your brow descent was so excessive that other interventions are now needed.  You may need revisional surgery.  I recommend that you consider getting a few oculoplastic surgery consultations prior to having the BOTOX to get a clear idea of what is going on.  Your current surgeon may be right on track but it that was the case, you probably would not be posting your question.  As you are in Los Angeles, you should have no problem finding a second opinion.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Chemical, Nonsurgical Brow Lift

+1

Regarding: "Botox to Relieve Eyebrow Heaviness After Double Eyelid Surgery - Good Idea?
Hi everyone. I am planning with a surgeon to use Botox to raise my medial eyebrow as they feel heavy after Double eyelid surgery (w/ ptosis repair). The eyebrows dropped a bit after surgery but enough for me to feel some slightly uncomfortable heaviness on my eyelid. That is what is causing an apperance of excess upper eyelid skin over my eyelids. Will a lot of botox need to be used, and I'm only 19, so excess upper eyelid skin is not a problem, right? Any alternatives? (besides revision
)?"

Without a photo with your eyes looking straight forward in neutral gaze it is impossible to advise you on what you should do.

Since all our facial muscles act as either LIFTERS or DOWN-PULLERS of each facial expression structure, a Plastic surgeon who is familiar with facial anatomy can use Botox to weaken one or the other group of muscles and thereby bring about a lifting or a lowering of some structures. This should be done in moderation. Few people would be happy with a permanent surprised brow look, a sleepy depressed brow and upper lid look or an exaggerated upturned corner of the mouth Jack Nicholson Joker look.

Using Botox in moderation along the inner brow would allow the Frontalis muscle to better lift and splay the brow. But - is the outside corner of the brow is not raised as well, you may get one of those amazing Jim Carey in The Mask brow contortions looks.

To teach yourself EVERYTHING you need to know about Botox, follow the link to the page below.

Good Luck.

Dr. Peter Aldea

Peter A. Aldea, MD
Memphis Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 60 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.