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Is Botox used for laugh lines and small wrinkles in cheek area?

Is Botox used for laugh lines and small wrinkles in cheek area? Also is it common to use Botox under eyes for bags and dark circles?

Doctor Answers (7)

Botox used for wrinkles related to hyperactive muscles

+2

Because Botox works by relaxing hyperactive muscles, it only works where the wrinkle is caused by that. Examples are crow's feet and the "eleven" between the eyebrows. There are a few other areas but the bags under the eyes are a different problem.


Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Botox for laugh lines and small wrinkles in the cheek area

+1

Botox is commonly used to treat horizontal forehead lines, crows feet around the eyes, and glabella frown lines between the brows. It is not ideal for use on laugh lines around the mouth, wrinkles in the cheek area and under the eyes.

The mouth is used for functions like speaking and chewing. So using Botox on muscles associated with these functions can entail risks.

Eye bags are caused by drooping muscles and fat tissue, as opposed to overactive muscles. Dark circles are the result of the skin under the eyes being thin. They can be caused by allergies, eczema, heredity, pigmentation irregularities, and sun exposure. Because these issues are not related to intense muscle contraction, Botox would not be useful in treating these issues.

Fillers like Radiesse can add volume to creases and hollows under the eyes. Additionally, Radiesse promotes the development of new collagen fibers which enhances the firmness of the skin.

Radiesse, along with Juvederm and Restylane are options for treating laugh lines, wrinkles in the cheeks and hollows under the eyes.

Because bags under the eyes are a structural issue, they can either be addressed with Radiesse or surgical blepharoplasty

Sanusi Umar, MD
Redondo Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

What areas of the face is Botox used for?

+1

Hi RML,

In our practice, Botox is commonly used for the "11" lines between the eyes, the crow's feet lines at the outer eye that show when smiling, the forehead and the upper lip. There are a couple more specialized procedures but these areas represent the vast majority of the procedures.

For under eye dark circles and bags, we use Restylane and this is called the "tear trough" procedure. You can see pictures of all our Botox procedures and the tear trough procedures if you visit our website link below. Good luck.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

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Botox used on Frown lines, Forehead lines, Laugh lines

+1

Botox is great for the forehead lines, lines between your eyebrows (called the glabella), and laugh lines.

Forehead: If your forehead lines are really deep, you may be compensating for a low eyebrow/ excess upper eyelid skin. Sometimes, you can't do botox on the forehead without causing your eyebrow to fall, which will make your eyes look tired.

Glabella: Great to get rid of the vertical lines between your eyebrows that help you frown (your kids will wonder, why isn't mommy mad anymore?). This area is also a good one for headaches. Botox is a well known treatment for migraines. Doesn't work for everyone, but does work for most.

Laugh lines: Crows feet, wrinkles around the eye. This is my personal favorite spot, as those lines that run out and down the cheek are aging, particularly in photos. This spot always wears off faster -- I find 3 months is about all you get. You can inject under the eyebrow to get a browlift. (unfortunately this wears off).

Cheek: You can't inject the cheek directly. If they are lines that are running from the eye, you can inject near the eye.

Lips and Neck: These are two areas you can do, but VERY light dose. You need to go to someone well versed in how to inject botox for these.

Lauren Greenberg, MD
Palo Alto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Botox is not good for bags or dark circles.

+1

Hi! Botox has many uses including forehead lines, frown lines between the eyebrows, laugh lines or crow's feet, and fine lines in the upper cheek. Botox can also give you a little brow lift.

For bags, you either need surgery or possibly Restylane injections. Dark circles have several different causes, so it's hard to tell without seeing you.

Go to a board certified plastic surgeon or dermatologist.

George J. Beraka, MD (retired)
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Botox injections - areas of common use

+1

Common areas of Botox use include the glabella (between the eyebrows), the forehead, the crows feet around the eyes, the sides of the nasal bridge area (the "bunny lines"), around the lips, the vertical neck lines. For excessive sweating, it is commonly injected to the underarms, palms and soles. Botox injections for cheek lines is usually not appropriate and Botox is not for undereye bags (may make this problem worse) or for undereye dark circles. Hope this helps.

Bryan K. Chen, MD
San Diego Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Botox is most commonly used between the eyebrows

+1

I get Botox frequently to the area between my eyebrows, and think it is one of the best things since sliced bread.

It can be used in the "crow's feet" area to the side of the eyes, which some people may refer to as laugh lines. However, it is not appropriate for the line that runs from the corner of the nose to the corner of the mouth. That line (the nasolabial fold) is better treated with a filler such as Juvederm. Also, small wrinkles in the middle of the cheek are not treatable with Botox, but may benefit from a topical resurfacing depending on how deep and how many lines are there. Discuss your concerns with your surgeon in detail.

Darrick E. Antell, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.