Botox Injections on the Scalp to Treat Hyperhidrosis?

I sweat profusely from my head. It is so bad that people assume I wear hair gels. I am almost always wet. Oddly, I have average perspiration from my armpits. I don't see why you couldn't inject Botox into the scalp (I can't wiggle my ears anyway.) I simply can't find anything on the Internet that references the practice. If it could be done, how many units would be required?

Doctor Answers (11)

Scalp Hyperhidrosis and Botox; Excessive Sweating - Treatment for Scalp Sweat

+3

Scalp Hyperhidrosis and Botox, Excessive Sweating - Treatment for Scalp Sweat

Botox can work for hyperhidrosis of any site and requires at least 100 -200 units when applied for hyperhidrosis of the scalp.

Anyone who has used it for this indication knows that it is a large area and therefore many injections are necessary to accomplish the goal.

It is my professional opinion that Botox is most practical for hyperhidrosis of the underarm followed by treatments for hyperhidrosis of the palms and feet. It is much less practical and less well tolerated by patients when used to treat hyperhidrosis of the scalp.

A more appropriate treatment may be sympathectomy as it does not require repeat treatment. No matter what technique is chosen, it is best to see a hyperhidrosis specialist who has the whole armamentarium to treat you - from your evaluation (comprehensive medical), possible treatment with medication by mouth, Botox injection and finally a sympathectomy.

H Karamanoukian, MD

Center for Excessive Sweating

www.EliminateSweating.com


Buffalo General Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Dry up your brow

+2

Extrapolating Botox treatments for sweating of the armpits, palms, and soles to the scalp is not a long shot.  It should be just as effective.  Since it is a relatively large surface it may require a large amount of Botox.  I would bank on at least 100units.  Good luck!

Kenneth R. Francis, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

The scalp is probably too broad of an area for Botox treatment

+2

This is a very unique question. Botox is very effective in treating hyperhidrosis (sweating) in defined anatomical areas such as the palms of the hands, soles of the feet, armpits, etc. It is my opinion that the scalp is too broad of an area to treat.

However, it would be simple enough to perform a small trial run. I would check into other medical or metabolic causes of excessive sweating such as hyperthyroidism.

Thanks for your question.

Stephen A. Goldstein, MD
Englewood Plastic Surgeon

You might also like...

It's not unusual for people to sweat excessively from other sites while the underarms stay dry...

+1

and wherever the sweating occurs, if it's troublesome or becomes an issue, then botox is there to take up the challenge...and best news yet...your ears still won't wiggle...unlike when botox is used into the muscles for cosmetic issues, it's injected very superficially into  the skin for sweat disorders...and of course it works well on the scalp
 

Ken Landow, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Botox Scalp

+1

Botox is an effective treatment for scalp perspiration.  You will need to identify which areas of the scalp you are sweating from (usually the hairline is a good place to start)  and plan a treatment accordingly.  You may need a couple sessions to determine how much and where you need to inject.

Good luck!

Young R. Cho, MD, PhD
Houston Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Hyperhidrosis of the Scalp

+1

There are many options for neurotoxins that work on the scalp for hyperhidrosis. These options include:

 

  1. Botox Medical
  2. Xeomin
  3. Dysport

All three options will exact a benefit for hyperhidrosis.

Raffy Karamanoukian, MD, FACS
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 47 reviews

Botox is very effective to stop sweating - even from the scalp

+1

You are in luck - Botox is very effective to stop sweating - even from the scalp. Botox is commonly used to stop sweating and the scalp is no exception. You should be able to find a plastic surgeon locally who will inject your scalp for you.

David Shafer, MD
Manhattan

David Shafer, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 57 reviews

Botox for a Sweaty Scalp

+1

Hi Not Luke,

It would be helpful if you could narrow down the exact area of your scalp where the main sweating is coming from.  Botox has been very successful in decreasing hyperhidrosis in the hands and armpits.  It should work as well in the scalp.  Good luck.

Dr. P

Michael A. Persky, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Boxot for scalp sweat might not work

+1

Although Botox is used for hyperhydrosis of the axilla and hands, I suppose it could be used for the scalp.  However, normally 100-200 units is used for treating the more common areas. It may be a bit too much to try to treat the scalp, and I am not sure if it would work well on such a large area.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 17 reviews

Sweat Stream? A Little Stab'll Do 'Ya

+1

Since the mechanism of action of sweating is similar to the nerve stimulation that produces unwanted muscle activity, there is no reason why Botox could not be used to treat it. Botox has proven to be effective for treatment of sweaty palms and excess underarm perspiration as well.

Because of the large surface area involved, I would recommend starting with a very dilute dose so that the Botox can be spread throughout the scalp, rather than concentrated in small areas as it would be with a lower dilution. I would also recommend starting with a relatively conservative dose of 50 units in a very dilute concentration (perhaps 10-20cc's), so that it covers the areas in question. If there is improvement, there is no benefit to using a higher dose, and potential side-effects are minimized.

Athleo Louis Cambre, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.