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Do Botox Results Change In Cold Weather?

I'm a 33 year old guy who had Botox for the first time 6 weeks ago on my forehead and glabellar lines, 2 weeks ago i also had filler in the forehead line. Over the last week the temperature here in the UK has dropped to below 0 in the mornings. When i'm out in the cold i have noticed that i have a lot more movement in my forehead and i can get movement in the lines. When i'm home after about 10 mins its back to normal?? I think i'm going crazy? Surely this is not normal? Many Thanks

Doctor Answers (7)

Botox effects in cold weather

+1

Although anything is plausible, it's not likely that cold weather is causing frequent changes in your ability to  contract muscles that were previously treated with Botox. A more likely explanation may be that you are actively using these muscles more so when cold and uncomfortable.  If this is the case, you may benefit from higher dosing.  However, if you are not able to replicate the same muscle function when attempting to animate while in a warmer climate, then the answer is yet to be determined.  Interesting nonetheless.

 


Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Enjoy Botox in any climate

+1

 

After injection, Botox goes to the muscles and the results are evident 1-2 weeks later. There are no issues with subsequently being in the cold climate. In fact, it gets pretty cold in Canada, and we have many patients treated with Botox at the Toronto Dermatology Centre (torontodermatologycentre.com/Cosmetic_BOTOX) in the winter with great results.

 

Anatoli Freiman, MD
Toronto Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Botox in cold or hot weather

+1

There really should not be any issues or changes seen when Botox (once already injected into a person) is exposed to cold or hot temperatures, especially if it was 2 or more weeks prior to the cold weather.

Benjamin Barankin, MD
Toronto Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Botox effect and cold weather

+1

There may be issues about Botox's clinical effects that are not yet known or understood. Your symptom of more muscle movement in the forehead when you're exposed to very cold weather may be real for you, but I had not heard of this before.  There may be some medical basis for it as neurologists and ophthalmologists may be aware of the ice test for myasthenia gravis, a neurologic condition that involves the same neurotransmitter that is blocked by Botox. The ice can temporarily improve nerve-muscle communication in myasthenia gravis.  In this condition, upper eyelids are known to droop during stress and as the day gets long.  An ice pack held over the eye for as little as two minutes can make the droop go away temporarily.  You may be showing a nature's way of mimicking the ice pack test by improving your neuromuscular communication until you go inside. Thank you for sharing this with us. Physicians learn from listening to patients.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Botox and the cold

+1

Botox results should not change with the cold weather.  The neurotoxin effects the motor end plates of the muscle units and bind with them

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

It is certainly plausible!

+1

It has been observed that neuomuscular cooling increases nerve conduction.  This observation is the basis for the so-called "Ice Test." for myasthenia gravis, a neuromuscular disorder.  Could cool of the muscle after BOTOX treatment be the basis for your observation?  It sure is an interesting question.  My advise is to come in from the cold.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

Do Botox Results Change In Cold Weather?

+1

Neurotoxins including Botox, Dysport and Xeomin are all absorbed by the tissues within minutes of being injected.  the effects last about 3 months and would not be affected by changes in temperature or weather.  

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.