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Will Botox for Migraines Provide Cosmetics Benefit As Well As Possible Migraines Relief?

I just got my Botox for migraines yesterday by my neurologist. I know it takes a week to see full effects and I praying for less migraines. But I am a bit curious given the injection site for medicinal botox, will I see any cosmetic changes/improvements? I am young with only noticeable lines when I contract my facial muscles. I know I am being greedy hoping for less migraines and cosmetics improvements but I figured it was worth asking.

Doctor Answers (12)

Botox for migraine headaches

+1

Patients that receive Botox in the temples, forehead comment that they do see some cosmetic relief from wrinkles in the crow's feet and forehead/corrugator areas respectively.


Buffalo General Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Botox for migraines

+1

If the Botox is given in a place where you normally have wrinkes from expression you may have a more relaxed appearance.

Deborah Ekstrom, MD
Worcester Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Botox

+1

It is entirely possible.  It all depends on where you receive the injections.  Injections in the forehead for tension headaches, for example, may provide for improved cosmesis.

Asif Pirani, MD, FRCS(C)
Toronto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 28 reviews

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Botox for migraines

+1

Depending on the sites of your Botox injections, you may see cosmetic improvement of dynamic wrinkles.

Martie Gidon, MD, FRCPC
Toronto Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Botox for cosmetic use may prevent headaches

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Many patients who receive Botox for their cosmetic needs often report that they get fewer migraine and tension headaches. When Botox is placed specifically for the prevention of migraine headaches by a neurologist, there may be a benefit cosmetically, but it depends entirely on where the Botox is placed. If your primary problem is headaches, seek help from a neurologist first. If you are mainly concerned about cosmetic improvement and happen to have headaches, seek help from an experienced physician who does cosmetic Botox treatments, and you may co-incidentally get improvement in your headaches.

Kimberly Finder, MD
San Antonio Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Botox and migraines

+1

It is very difficult to answer your question without first knowing where you were injected and how much Botox was used.

Sam Naficy, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 144 reviews

Botox works for migraines

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I have had many patients whose migraines have improved after Botox. Depending on the injection site there can be considerable cosmetic benefit.

Michele S. Green, MD
New York Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

Botox for headache-and wrinkles?

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Some of the areas that are injected with the usual migraine protocol will relax some forehead wrinkles but do not target all of the areas that a cosmetic injector would go after. If you have lines that you are concerned with two weeks after injection for headache, see a cosmetic injector for a "touch up"

Jo Herzog, MD
Birmingham Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Botox for migraines and cosmetic benefits

+1

Seeing an improvement for both of these will depend on where the injections were done, as well as the unit dosage. I would suspect you will see some cosmetic improvements, but can't say if it would be as complete an improvement as if it were done for cosmetic purposes only.

F. Victor Rueckl, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Will Botox for migraines provide cosmetic benefit as well?

+1

Botox does help with migraines in some people, and depending on exactly where it is injected on the face, it may give a cosmetic benefit as well.  

Michael I. Echavez, MD
San Francisco Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.