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I am considering botox for my feet. I have consulted a dermatologist but wanted to know of others success with this procedure?

I have had sweaty feet since I was in my teens. I am now in my mid 30's and and still battling with it. I take Robinul which helps my underarms and hands. I also do iontophresis for my hands to get them 95% dry. I tried it onto on my feet with no success. I am considering botox for my feet. I have consulted a dermatologist but wanted to know of others success with this procedure and does it create more sweating of the hands of other parts of the body?

Doctor Answers (4)

Hyperhidrosis and Botox

+1
Botox works extremely well for excess sweating under the arms, hands, and feet.  You will not produce excess sweat in other parts of the body  Please find a board certified dermatologist with experience in these injections for the best results.


New York Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

Botox for Hyperhidrosis or Sweaty Feet

+1
Thank you for your question.

Yes, Botox / Dysport / Xeomin are effective for hyperhidrosis (sweating) of the arm pits, hands and/or feet.

Dosing varies.

The treatment does not cause increased sweating elsewhere.

To be sure, see two or more board-certified plastic surgeons or dermatologists in your area for a full and complete evaluation to make sure you are a good candidate and that it is safe for you to have Botox injections.

I hope this helps.

J. Jason Wendel, MD, FACS
Nashville Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 37 reviews

Botox For the Feet

+1
Botox works great for foot sweating.  I have found better success with Dysport, it has more spreadability.  I agree with what was written already that the numbing is very important, but rarely can topical agents give full pain relief on the foot or hand and its an absolute mess. I typically do nerve blocks or use a combination of using a vibrator and ethyl chloride (cold spray) or ice packs.  Patients are very satisfied and have never complained.  I have done this for many years and typically use 50-100 U of Botox or 150-300 U Dysport to each foot.  The results last typically 4-6 months depending on the person.  You can get some temporary muscle weakness, so anyone who is a runner, gymnast, dancer -- who uses their feet often -- should do this procedure when they have a few weeks of no concern.  But, this is a rare complication, especially on the foot (more commonly seen on the hands).  I have done 100s of patients with success.  For axillary sweating, I find that laser liposuction with aggressive suction can get rid of 80-90% of sweating completely and do this quite often.  One treatment and the sweating is gone.  MiraDry helps axillary sweating, but isn't permanent like they say and costs almost as much as doing liposuction.  I treat the hands the same as the feet.  I have many patients where I treat sweating of their face, back, genitals (mainly runners and bicyclists) and they are very happy with the results.  Typically the procedure costs $2-3000/tx unless you can find someone who is willing to see if your insurance will pay for the medication; then they may only charge you an injection or treatment fee.  I wish you the best of luck, Dr. Emer.

Jason Emer, MD
Los Angeles Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 39 reviews

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Sweaty Feet work great with Botox

+1
Feet work great with Botox.    The best way to do this is to place a FULL tube of Emla Cream in a large surgical glove (8 1/2).  Then 2 hour  prior to  the procedure put both feet into a separate glove.  This dose of Emla is fine.  In the 2 hours in the glove the feet become numb.  It is best if the doctor massages the bulk of the Emla to the sole of the foot for obvious reasons.  This numbs the feet to the point where the injections do not hurt.  Ice helps but the injection in the foot gos way beyond the ice so please use Emla.   Each foot take 100u of Botox and this is fine.  If large feet it may take more.  If tiny feet possibly less.   So now after 2 hours one foot comes out of the glove and the injections are done with a 30 gauge 1/2 inch needle.  The Botox should be diluted considerably to 10 cc so each cc has 10 u.    This allows spread of the Botox. The injection process is deep dermis to sub dermal and consists of hundreds of needle sticks for good coverage.  There is benefit in knowing where the sweating comes from via the starch iodine test.  If you want to go on observation and history that is fine.  The entire central sole as well as toes need be treated.  Treatment is limited to the sole of the foot.  After one foot is done remove the glove from the other and again wipe the foot off.  Begin the same process with a new bottle of Botox and use the full 100 units.   This is a little bit of a project so the cost can be significant and generally runs around $2500 to $3000.   After treatment the patient can go home.  The feet stay numb for around 2 hours.  I have tried this process of numbing myself on one of my feet so I could explain better to patients.  Basically the foot come back to life in 2 hours and all is well.  The results patients report indicate the effects are nearly instantaneous.   The feet become dry to very dry and it seems the effects last at least 6 months and sometimes longer.  The time for the next treatment is when the sweating becomes a problem and this varies from patient to patient.  I have one patient that gets a year out of each treatment.   My experience with this is limited to 6 patients so that is not vast , but it is enough to get a good idea of the procedure.   I feel this is a great treatment and solves the problem when usually nothing else works.   Patients are so happy with this that it is actually a great pleasure to perform the procedure.    It is VERY important to not rush the numbing process.  Believe me it take a full 2 hours.  I suppose patients could start the process at home (numbing) but usually we have them come to the office.  Generous time must be planned.  This is a great procedure that works well and long.  My Best to you,  Dr C

George Commons, MD
Palo Alto Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 27 reviews

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