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Can I Get Botox for Under Eye Wrinkles at the Age of 17?

There not just 'fine lines' they are really deep about 3 under each eye. They are very noticeable too even when i have no expression on my face. I always get confused for being tired/stressed even though i'm completely fine, due to the wrinkles. They stand out too much in person/photos etc.. I really need some top sound advice help on this. I'm living in the uk is it legal for a 17 year old to get botox? If not any other treatment, all help/advice is appreciated - thank you.

Doctor Answers (9)

Botox for under eye wrinkles in a young woman

+3

Getting plenty of sleep, drinking plenty of water, and eating lots of fruits and vegetables, along with minimizing dehydrating fluids like caffeine & alcohol, and not rubbing the eye will make the biggest impact for under eye lines and wrinkles. If this is insufficient, there are some creams with vitamin C or retinol to be tried, or otherwise Botox can then be considered in highly trained & experienced hands (e.g dermatologist or plastic surgeon).

Toronto Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Too young for botox; botox for lower eyelid creases vs. wrinkles

+1

You may be too young for botox. First see a respected dermatologist or plastic surgeon to determine why you have lines. There may be causes other than muscle movement eyelid creases. Some people have lines because they have "hay fever" and asthma / atopic dermatitis. Some creases may be because of an enlarge muscle that forms a roll with a crease below it.

You need to be examined and see what your facial expressions do to the lines. There may be better treatment for you at 17 than having Botox injections every 3 to 4 months.

 

The information provided in Dr. Shelton's answer is for educational purposes only and is not intended to constitute medical advice.  The information provided should not be relied upon as a substitute for consultations with a qualified health professional who may be familiar with your individual medical needs.

Web reference: http://www.thenyac.com/zeltiq/index.html

Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Age limitations for Botox

+1

It is very difficult to determine what your issue is based on your explanation without pictures. You should consider posting pictures for better assessment!

Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 126 reviews

Botox at age 17

+1

Like the other doctors, I would be hesitant to say that Botox is a good idea at your age. Injecting Botox under the eye is an extremely delicate and technically challenging procedure, as this area is very unforgiving and you could end up with more problems than you have already. It's also hard to say how much these lines are your natural anatomy and how much are from overactive periorbital muscles. I recommend seeing a physician to see exactly what the underlying problem is and then perhaps they can offer you suggestions for the best solution. Good luck! 

New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 30 reviews

Improving the appearance of under eye wrinkles

+1

An appropriate skincare regimen, drinking lots of water and maintaining a healthy diet, resurfacing procedures such as peels and lasers, and finally Botox or Dysport injections can address fine wrinkles under the eyes. I would really need to see photos of your specific condition to help determine what would help. You are pretty young to be considering Botox, and the best treatment for you can be determined during a consultation with an experienced board certified physician. Thank you and I hope this helps!

Web reference: http://www.spaldingplasticsurgery.com/

Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

Botox for under eye wrinkles

+1

The advice that I was going to give has already been given by Dr. Barankin. Although I have not examined you in person, I can tell you that I would most likely recommend against Botox injections in your case. Most patients would not benefit from Botox treatments under the eye, especially young patients like yourself. Try more conservative methods to get rid of the tired look under your eyes. There are a number of topically applied skin care products that would be a much better alternative, if sleep, a healthy diet, and hydration don't fix your problem.

Fort Lauderdale Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Botox and young adults

+1

The short answer to your question is yes you can receive botox at your age for eyelid wrinkles. However, that being said if they are static wrinkles then botox will do little to improve them if help at all. Botox only works on dynamic wrinkles which are the result of movement. Your wrinkles may be static in nature and other causes such as dry skin, etc. can be the predominant issue. I would seek consultation in your area with an expert in facial aesthetics.

Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Botox for under eye wrinkles in 17 year olds

+1

One of the things to consider here is where do these wrinkles come from.  People with allergies, hayfever or other atopic disorders (asthma, eczema) have folds under their eyes called Dennie-Morgan lines.  Those are due to the allergies and environmental sensitivities.

These lines often go hand in hand with dark circles under the eyes, called allergic shiners.  They are also a manifestation of atopy and can make a person look tired.

It is worth trying to treat the allergies to see if Dennie-Morgan lines improve.  If there is no improvement, then Botox is a treatment option.  Your parents' consent needs to be obtained for treatment.  

Short Hills Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

A little early

+1

While botox skillfully injected can help wrinkles under the eyes, the basics as pointed out by Dr Barankin are correct. Use sunscreen (broad spectrum) EVERY day! Use a good hydrating eye cream at night. At your age those are your best bets.

 

Its not 'illegal' but ill advised to start botox so early in life.

Columbia Dermatologist

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.