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Is it Okay to do Botox on My Face if I Have Excema?(photo)

Hello, I suffer from excema on my face alot. Swelling severe itching etc. question is Would Botox injections be a bad thing for me or not? could it make my excema worse? Thank you

Doctor Answers (9)

Don't worry...actually botox may provide relief from your eczema...

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in many ways botox seems to be a wonder drug...reports suggest botox may indeed make symptoms of certain forms of eczema less irritating and possibly even temporarily resolve...the only important issue is botox shouldn't be injected through damaged skin since it may push bacteria from the skin's surface into the muscle and create a small risk of infection...sure you'll have a wonderful experience with your botox and maybe even benefit far beyond fewer wrinkles...good luck


Las Vegas Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

Botox & Eczema

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There is no reason that you cannot get Botox because of eczema. The two entities are unrelated. Perhaps while you're there you can speak with a dermatologist about how to make the eczema more manageable for you as well. Best of luck! 

Cameron Rokhsar, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Botox is OK if you have Eczema

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Yes, Botox is OK if you have eczema; as long as it is not injected into areas of active eczema.  I cannot ever recall Botox aggravating eczema in my nearly 20 years of Dermatology practice.  Good luck.

Robert Strimling, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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Botox and Eczema

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Greetings~

The main thing to take into consideration is not to have Botox injected into areas where the skin is cracked, open, broken, crusted, etc.  If the Botox is injected into areas where the skin is clear there is no foreseeable reason it should exacerbate your eczema.

Good luck!

Dr. Grant Stevens

Grant Stevens, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 76 reviews

Is it Okay to do Botox on My Face if I Have Excema?

+1

 I agree that as long as the area where the Botox or Dysport is to be injected, is clear of skin infection/crusting, it shouldn't be an issue.  

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Botox can be used in patients with eczema

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If there is well controlled eczema without any evidence of skin infections, then you should be able to have botox.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Eczema and botox

+1

Eczema is not a contraindication to Botox treatment as long as there is no infection in the skin area where Botox is to be performed 

Anatoli Freiman, MD
Toronto Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Botox Contraindications and Eczema

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Botox works by weakening muscles in the face. By weakening these muscles the wrinkles in the skin are subjected to less movement and therefore the wrinkles often improve over time.  Botox is FDA approved for treatment of the lines that develop in the glabella, which is the space in between the eyebrows.  It is often injected into other areas such as wrinkles in the forehead and the crow's feet.  Some of the contraindications to Botox include presence of infection, history of neuromuscular diseases, and bleeding disorders.  Eczema isn't necessarily a contraindication to Botox.  I would consult with a local physician and have an examination to determine if Botox is appropriate for you.

Jason E. Leedy, MD
Cleveland Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 34 reviews

Botox and eczema: is it safe?

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Eczema is an allergic skin condition of unknown cause. Botox is obviously injected under the skin into the muscle where it blocks the signals that make muscles contract. I am not aware of any contraindications to Botox injection in people with eczema, but I would avoid injecting in an area with active dermatitis or any kind of skin breakdown. 

Matheson A. Harris, MD
Salt Lake City Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.