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Can You Have Botox if You Had Cross-eyed Surgery?

Can You Have Botox if You Had Cross-eyed Surgery?

Doctor Answers (10)

Botox can be used after eye surgery

+1

Hello - If you're getting the Botox for cosmetic purposes, you should be fine. However, there is a risk of the Botox getting into the muscles around the eyes. If this happens, your vision may be altered, but it will only last about 3 months until the Botox effect resolves.

Web reference: http://www.drschreiberplasticsurgery.com/Procedures_Botox_865371.aspx

Baltimore Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 61 reviews

Botox can be used even if the eye muscles underwent surgery

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The Botox that is used for cosmetic concerns is used superficially on the muscles that control skin wrinkles around the eyes, and not on the muscles that control eye movement.

Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Botox and cross eyed surgery

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Botox should have no impact on the surgery that you had to repair your "crossed eyes" if properly injected.  Go to a qualified doctor to seek treatment.

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Local effect should not affect the eye muscles

+1

The effect of Botulinum toxin is local and as long the dose injected by the professional is not excess it should not go as far as the eye muscles. The muscles around the eye are located deep in the orbit .

Web reference: http://newportplastic.com/

Orange County Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Botox with eye surgery

+1

Yes, botox does not affect the muscles that actually move your eye. It only affects the muscles around the eye that are involved in facial expression. Go ahead!

Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Botox treatments work where they are injected

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Botox relaxes the facial expression muscles where it is injected. If you have had surgery on your eye muscles, this has no relationship to Botox treatments in other areas of your face.

Abington Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Botox after surgery for crossed eyes

+1

The placement of the Botox to decrease glabellar scowling should not interfere with the surgery. There are some possible side effects of lid and brow ptosis when the Botox is injected out of the targeted muscles but when done correctly it should not be an issue. Start out with lower doses if you are concerned with these possible side effects and work your way up to a dose that will lasts 3-4 months. Good luck.

Kennewick Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

This should not be a problem

+1

Please recognize that there is only a small chance of Botox drifting behind the eyelid. The risk is greatest when forehead treatment approaches within 1 cm of the orbital rim. Unfortunately if you are one of the rare few that does have a problem, weakening the muscles that align the eye could cause you to break fusion.

I recommend for this reason you see an eye plastic surgeon for you Botox. These are individuals who are board certified in ophthalmogy and fellowship trained in eye plastic surgery. They are uniquely qualified to help you given your history of eye muscle surgery.

Web reference: http://www.lidlift.com

Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Botox after surgery for crossed eyes

+1

The surgery for "crossed eyes" is done in the orbit -- botox is used around the eyes to decrease the forehead wrinkles and crows feet. It should be safe.

New York Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Botox is safe after eye surgery

+1

Yes, you can have Botox after eye surgery. Botox only effects the muscles that are treated with the Botox. It should not effect the eye muscles. As is always the case, just be sure to see an experienced cosmetic physician.

Philadelphia Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.

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