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Would a Botox Browlift Help with Droopy Eyelids?

I am 23 years old and I have a kind of droopy eyelids my plastic surgeon told me that eyelid surgery wouldn't make such a difference because a lot of it has to do with having low eyebrows and doesn't really think brow lift on someone my age is necessary or advantageous would a botox browlift help with my droopy eyelids... is it worth trying?

Doctor Answers 15

Would a Botox Browlift Help with Droopy Eyelids?

It is difficult to answer your question without a picture.  However, with that said, your question raises the issue of the difference between a low-set BROW and a droopy eye-LID...

(1) We typically encounter a drooping eye-BROW after Botox treatment -- this may happen when the brow-elevating muscle in the forehead, the Frontalis, receives too high a dose of Botox, or alternatively, if the Botox is sub-optimally placed too low in the forehead. However, in your case, you may have a low set eyebrow to begin with, so if you were to receive any Botox to the forehead, this would increase the likelihood of a brow droop. Regardless, a droopy (or low-set) eyebrow can sometimes be improved with Botox injected into the outside part of the eye (the lateral aspect of the orbicularis oculi muscle) to generate a bit of a brow lift in that area -- by injecting Botox and paralyzing the orbicularis muscle that normally acts to depress the brow in that area, you may get a slight compensatory brow lift.  This would be temporary, obviously, until the Botox wears off in 3-4 months... 

(2) Though rare, when encountered, a droopy eye-LID may be seen after Botox -- this occurs if the Botox is injected too close to your eyelid-elevating muscle, the levator palpebra superioris. In such a scenario, the Botox will diffuse inadvertently onto the levator muscle and cause an eyelid droop. One may have an increased risk of eye-LID drooping if you have a weakened upper eyelid muscle for neurological reasons, or a deeply set eye-BROW that would be more prone to drooping (as discussed above) -- this would result in skin gathering over the eyelid making the eyelid appear like it was drooping, which may be what your physician is talking about. A droopy eye-LID can be treated with Apraclonidine eye-drops but less likely to improve with Botox as mentioned above for a low-set or droopy eye-BROW...

My recommendations are to seek the services of an experienced physician injector.

I think the key with Botox lies in truly understanding the anatomy of the injected area, and more importantly the variability in the anatomy between patients -- for brows, the forehead, and anywhere else you plan on receiving a Botox injection. This includes having a firm understanding of the origin, insertion, and action of each muscle that will be injected, the thickness of each muscle targeted, and the patient variability therein. As an aesthetic-trained plastic surgeon, I am intrinsically biased since I operate in the area for browlifts and facelifts, and have a unique perspective to the muscle anatomy since I commonly dissect under the skin and see the actual muscles themselves. For me, this helps guide where to inject and where not to. However, with that said, I know many Dermatologists who know the anatomy well despite not operating in that area, and get great results.

Good luck.

Dr Markarian

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Botox and droopy eyelids

In general, botox can help a droopy eyelid if it helps raise the brow. Your doctor has to be careful not to inject the forehead too aggressively because you probably rely on raising your brow to be able to see if you have droopy eyelids. Unfortunately, without seeing your photo and dynamic movement of your forehead and your eyes, it is hard to say. The best option is to find a plastic surgeon who performs these procedures to understand whether or not this would be helpful to you.

Mike Majmundar, MD
Atlanta Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 32 reviews

Perhaps worth a try but you've got to be careful since there's a possibility that

you'll get worse rather than better...always possible to lift the brows but only by a bit...and if you have heavy overlying brows, then botox may not be the answer...need to have an evaluation by your dermatologist or surgeon with this in mind...and just another thought...might be possible to get some lift with a little filler above the brow...ask your doctor if in your case this might make more sense...

Ken Landow, MD
Las Vegas Dermatologist
4.5 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

Botulinum Toxin (Dysport and Botox) for droopy eyelids and eyebrows

I have used Botulinum Toxin (Dysport and Botox) for this purpose but it is very subtle and it works by throwing off the opposing muscle tensions around the eye,.Technically the eyebrows/eyelid are lifted by the forehead (frontalis) muscle but pulled down by the outer crow's feet muscles (orbicularis oculi). By weakening the latter, you allow the forehead to take over and exert an unopposed lifting effect on the eyebrow/eyelid
 

Otto Joseph Placik, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Botox brow lift

At 23 I doubt that you would need surgery. If your brows are low, sometimes a little bit of botox laterally can raise them a bit.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 18 reviews

At 23 Years old - Would a Botox Browlift Help?

It's possible.  As other members of the panel have mentioned, it's difficult to say without evaluating you in person.  With that said, we are able to achieve some lift with a Botox browlift specifically with heavy lids rolling over the outer eye.  The lift actually pulls the eyelid at a 45 degree angle upward toward the temple, helping a heavy outer lid look less tired.  If this is your issue, perhaps the Botox can help.  Good luck.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox and brow lifting

this is a good question, and better answered, by a physician injector who can see your  brow muscles and what you are trying to acheive. It sounds as though if Botox was recommended, then this may be a good option.

Purvisha Patel, MD
Germantown Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Botox or Dysport can lift the brow but will not replace a surgical browlift

If your surgeon is telling you that you need a browlift, then you should consider getting a brow lift.  While most people who get browlifts are older, age is not a contraindication.  Botox or Dysport can give you a temporary lift of the eyebrows.  You can always try this.  If it works and you don't mind repeating it every few months then stick with it.  However, if you want a more long term result and don't mind having a browlift, then speak with a board-certified plastic surgeon about getting a brow lift.  Good luck!

Dr. Parham Ganchi

Parham Ganchi, PhD, MD
Wayne Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 62 reviews

Droopy brows can be helped with Botox, sometimes

Great question.  Our practice is in the top 1% in the country for Botox and it has been my experience that Botox is usually effective to give a lift to the brow.  It doesn't always work ,though and the best way to find out is to try it!  Botox is the #1 cosmetic treatment in the world and is very popular.  Give it a try!

Good Luck,

Robert F. Gray,MD, FACS

Robert F. Gray, MD, FACS
Bay Area Facial Plastic Surgeon
3.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Brow lift or botox lift for a 23 year old

If you and your doctors feel that you are too young for a brow lift surgery, you might obtain some improvement, to "buy you time" with the use of Botox in the glabella (between the eyebrows) and outer eyebrow  which will help lift the eyebrow slightly. Some patients also get a lift of the droopy eyelid by injecting hyaluronic acid fillers into the eyebrow region and slightly below it.

Ronald Shelton, MD
Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 33 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.