Should Botox Be Administered While You Are Lying Down or Sitting Upright?

I've had 2 different doctors administer Botox. One indicates it is not acceptable to give the injections to a patient that is lying down. The other indicates it is okay to inject in a prone patient. Does it matter?

Doctor Answers (21)

Position for placement of botox

+1

The insertion sites of botox are related to your muscular and bony landmark anatomy and doesn't change with position. Many doctors have been trained to inject aesthetic fillers with the patient sitting or reclining at a 45 degree angle but not less, so that they can see the effects of gravity and a more natural position of the folds and creases, which do change if one were to lie down. There has been no study to indciate if the injection of botox in a patient who is lying down will cause the botox to move to undesired muscle recipients in the adjacent area. 


Manhattan Dermatologist
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Botox may be injected with the patient sitting up or lying down.

+1

The position of the patient during the injection does not affect the efficacy or safety of the Botox. However, the evaluation and marking of the patient should be performed in the sitting up position.

Leyda Elizabeth Bowes, MD
Miami Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Positioning During Botox Injection

+1

I prefer to evaluate and mark a patient while they are sitting up, then inject in a reclined position.  I do not think that lying down during the injection increases the risk of diffusion.  I do have patients sit up immediately after the procedure and advise them to avoid lying down or taking a nap for 3-5 hours after treatment.  

Lauren Fine, MD
Chicago Dermatologist

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Botox

+1

It really doesn't matter, usually just based on the Dr administering preference.  I prefer all my patients sitting up, as this is how I examine them. 

Hannah Vargas, MD
Kansas City Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 22 reviews

Patient position during Botox Injection

+1

Patient position should not have an affect on Botox Cosmetic results. Most plastic surgeons and dermatologists have the patient recline in the chair a little. Choose whatever position that is most comfortable for you. Best of luck.

Dr. Chaboki

 

Houtan Chaboki, MD
Washington DC Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 46 reviews

Botox administration

+1

I prefer to inject botox with the patient sitting up. Be that as it may, some may find it easier for the patient to be lying flat.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Should botox be administered while lying down?

+1

It is usually ideal to have  a patient sitting up for injection or slightly reclined back. There is documented diffusion, seemingly greater with Dysport than Botox, so positioning is just to minimize that risk

Lori A. Brightman, MD
New York Dermatologic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 11 reviews

Sitting or laying down for Botox injections

+1

I dont think it matters- whatever you and your doctor are comfortable with is the best position for injections.
I inject with the person seated and most of my colleagues do as well.

However, some of my friends inject laying down (the patient, not the doctor) and they get great outcomes

The key to success with any injection is to know the anatomy and use the right dose but I dont think it matter what position you are in.

Kenneth Beer, MD
Palm Beach Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox Administered? Sitting Up or Lying Down

+1

I administer Botox for facial treatment while my patient is sitting up, after I examine them, also in a sitting position. When I am treating the underarms, my patient is in a supine (lying down) position.

 

Anifat Balogun, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon

Lie down of sit up for botox

+1

It all depends on what your doctor prefers. I do all of mine sitting up unles it is at the time of surgery and then the patient is supine>

David A. Bray, Sr., MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.