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Botox While Pregnant: Can it Harm my Child?

Hello! I read about the woman who got Botox five weeks after her last menstrual period. It says that you do not believe that the embryo is damaged. Now, unfortunately I took a botox syringe when I was 12 weeks and my anxiety is unbearable. My question is can my children have suffered because it had gone further in my pregnancy or the same as for the woman who took her injection at the beginning of her pregnancy. I did not know about the prohibition of botox during pregnancy. Thanks!

Doctor Answers (12)

No one recommends cosmetic botox when pregnant.

+2

Mollymy

Of course that is not your question.  Your question is that you got BOTOX at week 12 and you want to know will it harm your child.  Because no formal testing has been done for BOTOX in pregnant women, on one can actually answer that question.  There is a very small study of women who did receive BOTOX while pregnant there were absolutely no effects to their children.  Also for certain medical conditions, such as neck spasm, doctors are occasionally forced to recommend BOTOX during pregnancy.  This is a completely off-label use of the product.  There are no reports of adverse consequences.  However, generally, experts do not feel it is possible to say definitively yes it is safe.  The best advice in this circumstance is to speak with your obstetrician and obtain their recommendation and guidance.


Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

Botox and pregnancy

+2

Although using Botox during pregnancy is contraindicated it is unlikely that your cosmetic treatment will have ill effects on the baby. Treatment is supposed to stay localized to the area injected-- if the Botox travelled to other parts of the body in any significant way it would be contraindicated for you, too! That being said, avoid any further treatments with Botox until the pregnancy and breastfeeding are over.

Dina D. Strachan, MD
New York Dermatologist
3.5 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Botox and Pregnancy

+2

Botox is definitely something to avoid while pregnant.  That said, as a mother of 3 myself, no matter how hard we try, "mistakes" will always happen.  As mothers, we always find ways to blame ourselves for anything negative that happens to our children whether we actually caused it or not.  Stress is not good for you or the baby, so I would recommend trying to worry as little as possible and get ready for the wonderful time as a new mother you will soon enjoy!

Victoria W. Serralta, MD
Arlington Dermatologic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

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Botox is pregnancy category C

+2

According to the FDA, botox is category C. But most of the product should stay local in your forehead and not get absorbed into your system. Thta's the whole idea of the treatment. Therefore, your baby should be fine. But in the future, I would recommend not to get any cosmetic treatments while pregnant.

Gary Goldenberg, MD
New York Dermatologist

Botox While Pregnant

+1

Hi Molly.  Sorry to hear about all the anxiety this issue is creating for you.  While no one knows for sure if Botox can harm the fetus (there are no studies), Botox is normally confined to a very small area in and around the muscle to which it is injected.

While it's perfectly reasonable to have anxiety about this issue, we would try to do everything you can to come to peace with the issue for two reasons.  First you cannot go backwards and reverse the injection and second, more stress during your pregnancy will not be good for you and the baby.  Good luck.

Harold J. Kaplan, MD
Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox while pregnant

+1

Congratulations on your pregnancy!  I'm sorry to hear that you are having so much anxiety.  My recommendation would be to consult your ob/gyn.  There haven't been any formal studies for the effects of Botox on pregnancy but is definitely not something you should do.  Please see your ob/gyn.  I'm sure he/she will be happy to answer your questions and check to make sure your baby is ok.

Dr. Cat Begovic

Catherine Huang-Begovic, MD
Beverly Hills Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 5 reviews

Botox while pregnant

+1

There have been no formal studies looking at Botox and it's safety in pregnancy.  However, there is one study that found that women who received botox and later found out they were pregnant had uneventful pregnancies.  Always tell a physician that you are pregnant (at whatever stage you are in) whenever receiving any treatments or medications and consult your Ob/Gyn for further reccomendations and insight into this issue.  

Keshini Parbhu, MD
Orlando Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Botox and pregnancy

+1
You should absolutely stay away from Botox while pregnant or nursing. I would consult with your OB\GYN and hopefully he/she will give you some peace of mind. Botox should stay local in the area of injection and not be absorbed into your system. I would avoid putting anything into your system that is not fully necessary for health purposes and is prescribed and consented to by your OB physician. In my practice a consent form and history and physical are done prior to treatment and "Is their a possibility you may be pregnant?" is a question always asked. I would not treat any patient who answered yes to this question and would cancel the procedure until my patient was finished with the preganancy and nursing. Best regards!

Michael Elam, MD
Orange County Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 132 reviews

Botox while pregnant

+1

I do not recommend Botox while pregnant or nursing.  I would consult your OBGYN to discuss the topic further.

Thomas T. Nguyen, MD
Orange County Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Do not get Botox while pregnant

+1

I do not recommend you get Botox while you are pregnant.  It has not been studied or documented yet but is not worth the risk.  Just wait and do it after you give birth and are done breastfeeding. 

Babak Azizzadeh, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.