Bloody Supply with Fillers/ Gore-tex Implant

I have been looking to get a nose job done, but for the past few yrs, I have opted to get temporary fillers injected to raise the bridge of my nose. Sometimes, I can feel a squeezing sensation in the nose, almost as if it is fighting for blood supply. Also, when I go out in the cold, my nose is cold while the rest of my face is warm. If I get a permanent rhinoplasty using a gore-tex implant, will there still be similar sensations that fillers cause (lack of blood supply, coldness)?

Doctor Answers (6)

Filler for Dorsal Augmentation

+1

Hello,

Downsides of nonsurgical rhinoplasty include the temporary nature of the change, and the possible compromise of the blood supply to the nose.  Compromising the blood supply may put the skin at risk of necrosis with future injections or surgery.  It is difficult to predict if there would be sensations following a Gore-tex implant. A great way to augment the dorsum without using an artificial implant is with the use of your own natural tissue and cartilage. Deep temporalis fascia wrapped with diced cartilage works excellent to improve the appearance of the nasal dorsum. It is readily accepted by the body, and there is minimal risk of infection. Thank you and I hope this helps.

Dr. Nassif


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 35 reviews

Nasal Sensations Following Filler Injections

+1

I doubt the nasal sensations you describe after filler injections are related to your blood supply. However, blood supply is very important when considering a rhinoplasty. If I augment an Asian nose, I prefer to use the patient's own tissue because there is less risk of movement and post-op infection. With synthetic materials, I feel that Silicone is safer than Gortex because there is less risk of infection.

Richard W. Fleming, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Rhinoplasty with Gore-Tex

+1

Gore-tex is a common material used as a nasal implant to augment the bridge of the nose.   This kind of rhinoplasty is caused augmentation rhinoplasty and is more common in non-caucasian patients.  Fillers can be injected into the nose to also camouflage a dorsal hump or bump, augment the nasal tip, and change the nasal shape temporarily.  Depending upon your nasal shape you may not need a nasal implant at all.   If  you do, Gore-tex when properly done should not cause cold intolerance in your skin. 

James C. Marotta, MD
Long Island Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

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Dorsal Augmentation

+1

Hi,

The key to successful implant is placement. The implant has to be placed in the right tissue plane. If it is placed too superficial, then you may have problems like cold sensitivity. Gortex implants will have some blood supply and tissue in-growth overtime but it still needs to be  placed in the right plane.

 

 

Oleh Slupchynskyj, MD, FACS
New York Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 217 reviews

Http://www.realself.com/question/bloody-supply-fillers-gore-tex-implant

+1

 During your Rhinoplasty consultation the nasal skin and its blood supply should be evaluated.  You might consider having a silastic dorsal implant instead of a Goretex one, that IMHO has a tendency to get infected years later for no apparent reason.

Francis R. Palmer, III, MD
Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Permanent nasal augmentation

+1

Typically, grafts placed on the nasal dorsum such as goretex become overgrown by your body's own fibrous tissue and they are not felt. However, I have had some patients report that in cold weather that they can feel their goretex implant so I do not discount that as a possibility. Otherwise in general the implant should integrate with your own tissue.

Scott Trimas, MD
Jacksonville Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 9 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.