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I Had a Blepharoplasty 8 Months Ago. Today a Stich is Poking Through the Skin. Is This OK?

The surgeon told me at the time that he used dissolvable sutures on the superficial layer, whilst a non-dissolvable suture remained deeper. I had no issues after removal of sutures and the scar has healed and remained good until today. There is a small round raised area with what lloks like a white suture end sticking through. What should i do?

Doctor Answers (10)

I Had a Blepharoplasty 8 Months Ago. Today a Stich is Poking Through the Skin. Is This OK?

+1

 The deep suture might have been used to fix your upper eyelid crease, so it's best that you contact the plastic and cosmetic surgeon that did your Upper Lid Surgery.


Beverly Hills Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Spitting stiches

+1

You are splitting a buried suture.  See your plastic surgeon, who can remove it safely and without fuss.

Robert L. Kraft, MD
New York Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

I Had a Blepharoplasty 8 Months Ago. Today a Stitch is Poking Through the Skin. Is This OK?

+1

    Your surgeon should be able to remove this stitch at an office visit.  Kenneth Hughes, MD Los Angeles, CA

Kenneth B. Hughes, MD
Los Angeles Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 180 reviews

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Spitting Suture

+1

You simply have a spitting suture. Call your surgeon to schedule an appointment and the suture will be clipped and the problem should resolve. Best wishes.

Robert F. Centeno, MD, FACS
Fairfax Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 25 reviews

EASY TO REMOVE byVillar

+1

If a permanent suture is used to secure the muscle to the lateral corner of the eye,  sometimes it will show through the skin in thin patients.  After 8 months, it can be safely removed with a simple nick in the skin.  Its job has been done.  Best wishes. Knowledge is power.  Luis F. Villar MD FACS

Luis Villar, MD
West Palm Beach Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 6 reviews

Just call your surgeon and have them remove the stitch.

+1

It is not like the deep stitches are buried miles under the skin.  Removing this type of suture is not a big procedure.  Contact your surgeons office, let them know what is going on, and let them take care of it.  At the same time, they can look to see if there are any other sutures that need to be removed.

Kenneth D. Steinsapir, MD
Los Angeles Oculoplastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 14 reviews

Stitch poking through the skin

+1

This is likely one of the deeper sutures your surgeon described working its way to the skin surface. It should be very simple to have this removed. 

Sheldon S. Kabaker, MD
Oakland Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 8 reviews

Suture Appearing Months after Blepharoplasty

+1
  • Occasionally absorbable sutures may be "spit" out by the body before they are fully absorbed.  Your plastic surgeon should be able to remove this without much difficulty. Additionally, if it is a permanent suture protruding through the skin, this too will need to be removed.  
  • Definitely, contact your surgeon so he/she may evaluate this. 

Joshua Cooper, MD, FACS
Seattle Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 13 reviews

Suture? Impossible to Say

+1

8 months after surgery, a suture extruding through the skin is not the normal course events but unlikely to have any effect on your result.  I recommend seeing your Surgeon for evaluation and treatment of the problem.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

A suture protruding through the skin 8 months following a blepharoplasty.

+1

To answer you question, this is not dangerous, but is it also not OK. I suggest you visit your PS and have the suture removed, which should be quite simple.

E. Ronald Finger, MD
Savannah Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.