Lump After Transconjunctival Blepharoplasty

I had laser transconjunctival Blepharoplasty 2.5 weeks ago and upper and lower laser skin resurfacing to remove fat pads which caused bags and wrinkles. I am thrilled with the result. However, now that most of the swelling had gone done, I can see and feel a lump on my left lower eyelid, about the size of a rice grain, along the incision. I went back for check-up and the surgeon suggested I wait another 2 weeks to see if there any changes. He also suggested that sometimes, scar tissue may form along the incision, hence the lump. Apparently, to get rid of this there is a simple procedure that involves an injection in that area. Does this lump/scar tissue often happen? Can it be corrected?

Doctor Answers (2)

Transconjunctival Blepharoplasty

+2

Transconjunctival Blepharoplasty is a great way to get rid of unwanted bulging fat pads at the lower eyelids. The big advantage of this approach is that it eliminates the need for a lower eyelid skin incision. Excess skin can then be tightened with CO2 laser resurfacing.

If you indeed have had a purely transconjunctival approach there should be no incisional scar to cause problems. In that case the most likely problem is residual swelling, and in fact lower lid swelling can take several months to fully resolve.

If the laser resurfacing was very deep there could be scarring of the skin, in which case it might be helpful to use a silicone-gel product daily ( such as Kelocote ). Massage may also help. Be sure to avoid sun-exposure as well.


Coral Springs Plastic Surgeon
1.0 out of 5 stars 1 review

Lump after blepharoplasty

+1

A lump after blepharoplasty is not that common. It can be due to scar tissue like your surgeons mentioned. You should give it time to resolve on its own. It may be some fatty tissue as well. Be patient, it may just disappear on its own over time.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 16 reviews

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