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Blepharoplasty Complications

I'm considering having blepharoplasty eyelid surgery next year. What kind of complications might I run into if I get this done? What is the best way to handle it if you do have eyelid surgery complications?

Doctor Answers (35)

Blepharoplasty Complications

+3

The most important process of your prospective blepharoplasty is choosing your eye lid surgeon very carefully. Consult with and interview a few surgeons and then choose whom you feel most comfortable. Do not let the cost of the procedure be your determining factor in the choice of your eyelid surgeon as sometimes you may get "what you pay for".

Complications with eyelid surgery may occur, but they are extremely rare in the hands of experienced and skilled surgeon. If you have done your due diligence in choosing your surgeon, most likely you will not have any complications, but most importantly, that surgeon will know how to take care of any adverse events.

Good luck and be well.

Dr. P


Los Angeles Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 23 reviews

There are many options when considering blepharoplasty

+2

Blepharoplasty is one of the safest, effective procedures in plastic surgery.  However, over the past 10 years we have seen a variety of options appear.  The reality is most patients looking to make the area around the eyes look better have a number of options, from traditional surgery, to less invasive surgery, to non surgery.  There are lasers, fillers, and even Botox/Dysport as options to consider in many cases, depending on how severe the problem is and the ultimate goals for improvement.  In many cases, I combine less invasive treatment, like laser, with injectable fillers to achieve safe, fast, effective solutions to enhance the appearance of the eyes.  It is very important to discuss your goals and desires with your plastic surgeon to make sure everyone is thinking the same thing- How long will the result last? What is the recovery time? What is the cost of the different options?  Keep these simple things in mind to make your informed decision.

Julius W. Few, MD
Chicago Plastic Surgeon
3.5 out of 5 stars 4 reviews

Complications from eyelid surgery most often involve the lower lids.

+2

Malposition of the lower lid is probably the most common unwanted byproduct of blepharoplasty.  It is more common in older patients who have poor lid support but can occur in anyone.  It is treatable.  It is uncommon.  Other complications can occur but are rare.  Eyelids are well innervated so post-op hypersensitivity is common although it would not be considered a complication, just an undesired side effect.

Vincent N. Zubowicz, MD
Atlanta Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 7 reviews

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Possible blepharoplasty complications

+2
Complications that can occur after blepharoplasty are very rare but can include the inability to close the upper lid if too much skin is taken, and dry eye. If patients currently have dry eyes, blepharoplasty surgery can make the eyes drier. Permanent blindness and double vision are exceedingly rare and do not happen in experienced hands.  It is best to have confidence in your surgeon that he/  she knows how to handle these types of issues.  Look for a very experienced  eyelid surgeon for  consistent and best results. For many examples of eyelid surgery, please see the link below

William Portuese, MD
Seattle Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 54 reviews

Complications with Blepharoplasty

+2

Complications although rare can occur with blepahroplasty surgery. Upper eyelids can include not being able to close the eyes fully, uneven eyelid openings, hollow look from excessive fat excision, scarring and a few others even more serious. Lower eyelid surgery can result in retraction or pulling downward of the eyelid, tearing, scarring, rounding of the corners, change in the shape of the eyes and others as well. Both can result in dry eyes, and problems with vision. These are risks, but the vast majority of people who get this popular procedure are happy. Consider researching an experienced blepharoplasty surgeon who also deals with its complications.

Robert Schwarcz, MD
New York Oculoplastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Blepharoplasty complications

+2

The most common complications of blepharoplasty are bruising, asymmetry, unfavorable scarring, hematoma, chemosis (eye irritation) and probably one of the worst rare complicaitons is blindness. It is best to be treated by an expert whether a plastic surgeon, oculoplastic, or ENT.

Steven Wallach, MD
Manhattan Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 15 reviews

Blepharoplasty Complications

+2

There are complications with any procedure and some are specific to a person's medical conditions. With upper eyelid surgery, the main complication to be conerned with is taking off too much skin causing the eyelid not to close. This is easily avoided by marking the skin to be excised before surgery and checking the markings before any anesthesia is given. Other complications include dry eyes, scarring, pain, blindness, and webbing of the upper eyelid. Overall, upper eyelid surgery is very safe and can often be performed with only local anesthesia.

Obviously, the best way to deal with complications is to avoid them. Unfortunately, complications occur even under the care of the most experienced surgeons. When choosing a surgeon, finding one who has technical expertise is the first step to getting a good result. Probably more important is finding a surgeon who is able to deal with complications. Finding a surgeon who deals with other surgeon's complications is often a good starting point. In this way, should you have a complication, you can rest assured that it will be dealt with in the best way possible. The surgery itself is easy to perform; dealing with the complications can be much more difficult.

D.J. Verret, MD
Dallas Facial Plastic Surgeon
4.0 out of 5 stars 12 reviews

Blepharoplasty Complications

+2

Generally, upper eyelid Blepharoplasty is a very high satisfaction, low complication type procedure. Lower lid Blepharoplasty has a greater complication rate, but should still be very low in experienced hands.

However, given the question, I will give you the standard run down of complications I explain to may patients (informed consent). Realize that informed consent is a process which allows you to understand exactly what you are proceeding with, not to scare you, but to make sure you are fully educated.

Upper Eyelid:

1) Over resection of skin and inability to close the eyes. I explain to patients that this could happen, but is very easy to avoid. I pinch the eyelid skin while the patient is awake to determine the maximum amount of skin I can safely remove. I then take a little bit less than that.

2) Dry eyes. As we age, we produce less and less tears; every patient gets a temporary dry eye syndrome after eyelid surgery and artificial tears are required. A permanent, clinically significant dry eye syndrome is possible albeit rare and probably more related in nature to over-resection of skin.

3) Asymmetry of eyelid creases. Generally speaking, the lower part of the upper lid incision is made along the upper eyelid crease and correct marking of skin and incision placement avoids this problem. This problem is more likely to occur if the surgeon wishes to reset the upper eyelid crease.

4) Unmasking of pre-existing ptosis. If ptosis (droopy eyelid) is not recognized preoperatively, it generally becomes fairly obvious after the surgery.

5) Bleeding, infection ,scarring. Bleeding is minimal. I have never seen an upper lid incision become infected. Upper eyelid skin is the thinnest in the body and typically forms excellent scars.

Lower eyelid Surgery:

I mention most of the complications above first.

1) Lower lid retraction and/or ectropion. This applies primarily to external approaches, not to transconjunctival approaches. However, in my opinion, an external approach is frequently required to address the tissue descent and skin excess seen with the facial aging process. If excess skin is removed without adequate muscle suspension, the lower lid will lose the battle of the scarring process with the cheek. In severe cases, this can lead to ectropion and corneal exposure. This is an avoidable complication based on experience and judicious technique. It is also more likely to occur in revision cases.

2) Loss of Eyelashes. This is possible but very avoidable via judicious tissue handling and incision placement.

3) Loss of vision. This has been described in the literature via case reports; these reports mainly come from the time period where the anti-platelet activity of aspirin was not recognized, and in cases performed where uncontrolled hypertension was not addressed preoperatively. I have never seen this happen in my community but I always mention it so that a patient is fully informed.

Stephen Prendiville, MD
Fort Myers Facial Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 31 reviews

Blepharoplasty Complications

+1
Blepharoplasty surgery has an excellent safety track record in experienced hands.  Scars typically do well fading quickly and nicely.  Occasionally a scar revision will be done to improve a scar problem.  If you have a tendency for dryness of the eyes and use drops regularly then a blepharoplasty can increase dry eyes.  The amount of skin that is removed needs to be carefully judged to that the lids close normally and there is not too much white of the eye showing.  Vision loss and infection are exceedingly rare.  Complications will be discussed during your consultation.

Susan D. Vasko, MD, FACS
Columbus Plastic Surgeon
4.5 out of 5 stars 3 reviews

Complications Seen With Blepharoplasty: Infection, Bleeding, Hematoma, Asymmetry, Excess Scarring, Injury

+1

Complications following blepharoplasty surgery are fortunately uncommon.  This procedure is associated with high patient satisfaction rates and low complication rates.

Complications seen with blepharoplasty include infection, bleeding, hematoma, asymmetry, excess scarring, injuries to the eye, blindness, and dry eye syndrome.

In addition, rarely patients have less than optimal aesthetic results which require secondary surgery.

It’s important to understand that the majority of patients have uneventful recoveries and are extremely happy with their aesthetic result.

Richard J. Bruneteau, MD
Omaha Plastic Surgeon
5.0 out of 5 stars 72 reviews

These answers are for educational purposes and should not be relied upon as a substitute for medical advice you may receive from your physician. If you have a medical emergency, please call 911. These answers do not constitute or initiate a patient/doctor relationship.